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Army Enlisted Aide Handbook

Volume II: Guide for the Army Enlisted Aide

25 JUNE 2015

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Preface Enlisted aides are authorized for the purpose of performing a wide variety

of military and official tasks and details for Army general officers. It is important that both the general officer, to include the general officer’s spouse, and the enlisted aide have a comprehensive understanding of the duties, responsibilities, and limits inherent in the enlisted aide program. Accordingly, there are two volumes of the Enlisted Aide Handbook:

Army Enlisted Aide Handbook Volume I for the General Officer, their

Spouse, and the General Officer’s personal staff.

Army Enlisted Aide Handbook Volume II for the Enlisted Aide.

These handbooks were written to give a fundamental understanding of the enlisted aide program on the one hand, and to ensure the vitality of the enlisted aide program on the other.

Handbook Volume I, takes the general officer and their spouse through the process of selecting a potential enlisted aide through a summary of enlisted aide permissible and impermissible duties. It highlights vignettes to provide realistic examples to guide the employment of the enlisted aides. Moreover, it describes the necessary enlisted aide professional development and counseling requirements. Finally, this volume contains a compilation of enlisted aide policies and directives along with an explanation of the life cycle management of Army enlisted aides.

Handbook Volume II, oriented from the enlisted aide perspective, explains the enlisted aide application and selection process and in great detail, the day-to-day enlisted aide responsibilities and duties. This volume provides substantial guidance in all aspects of enlisted aide functions to include military customs and courtesies, household management, physical security, entertaining, purchasing and accountability, and care and maintenance of Army general officer uniforms.

Taken together, these Army Enlisted Aide Handbook volumes ensure the proper quality, effective management, and correct use of the enlisted aide. They also promote the professionalism of the enlisted aide through proper training and compliance with necessary Soldier skills.

Applicability This information applies to all Army enlisted aides serving in Army-specific billets. Enlisted aides serving in joint billets follow DoDI policy amplification from the controlling Service (i.e., the Service-specific enlisted aide policy of the service of the general officers authorized the services of an enlisted aide).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Policy 8 A. Policy Overview B. Summary of Selected Policy Documents 1. DoDI 1315.09, subject: Utilization of Enlisted Aides (EAs) on Personal Staffs of General and Flag Officers (G/FOs) 2. Director of Army Staff Memorandum 3. AR 614-200 (Enlisted Assignments and Utilization Management) II. Program Management 10 A. Program Overview B. Enlisted Aide Program Process 1. Recruiting 2. Candidate Selection 3. Training 4. Nomination 5. Assignment/Management III. Interview and Hiring Process 12 A. Nomination Procedures B. Interview Process C. Interview Preparation D. The Interview E. Interview Conclusion F. Interview Follow-up IV. Enlisted Aide Job Requirements 18 A. Duty Workplace Needs (Office) B. Personal Military Standards C. Obtaining a Passport D. Obtaining a Security Clearance V. Enlisted Aide – Execution of Duties 23 A. Overview B. Duty Uniform C. Duty Hours VI. Counseling and Professional Development (Enlisted Aide Specific) 30 A. Overview B. Requirements 1. Rating Scheme 2. Initial Counseling 3. Follow-Up Counseling C. NCOER D. Enlisted Aide Professional Development

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VII. Ethics and Military Courtesy 34 A. Ethics B. Army Values C. Morals D. Military Customs and Courtesies E. Personal Conduct F. Interaction with General Officers and Their Guests G. Interaction with the General Officer’s Spouse H. Telephone Etiquette VIII. Enlisted Aide Duties - Household Management 41 A. Household Cleaning and Maintenance Schedules B. Maintenance - Reporting Damage C. Maintaining Linens D. Maintaining Lead Crystal E. Window Cleaning F. Ceiling, Walls, Baseboards, and Rails G. Light Fixtures H. Maintaining Bathrooms I. Floors – Carpet, Hardwood, Tile J. Cleaning Furniture K. Pre-Termination of Quarters L. Household Property Inventory/Accountability IX. Physical Security and Crime Prevention 56 A. Required Training B. Reviewing the Security Program C. Basic Security Procedures D. Personnel Access to Residence E. Receiving Mail F. Threat Identifiers G. Security Alarms H. Security Containers I. Operations Security (OPSEC) J. Handling a Telephone Threat K. Force Protection Conditions X. Entertaining 64 A. Overview B. Use of Official Representation Funds C. Protocol D. Official Events E. Un-Official Events F. Types of Social Events G. Planning Menus

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H. Helpful Hints Regarding Menus I. Table Service J. Plate Presentation K. Basic Rules and Recommendations for Meal Service L. Basic Bartending XI. Purchasing and Accountability 89 A. Overview B. Type of Funds C. Payment of Items D. Delegation of Authority E. Helpful Hints When Making Purchases F. Tracking Purchases G. Purchase Orders H. Receipts I. Reimbursem*nts for Personal Duty Expenditures J. Petty Cash Fund K. Storage and Inventory of Subsistence and Beverages L. Storing Subsistence M. Inspection of Food and Beverages N. Subsistence Disposal XII. Care and Maintenance of General Officers Uniforms 98 A. Overview B. Care of Uniforms C. Tips for a Perfect Wash D. Ironing Basics E. Sewing Tips F. Shoe Shining Tips G. Dress Uniforms: Army Blue Dress and Mess Dress H. Service Uniforms: Army Service Uniform I. Utility Uniforms – Army Combat Uniform J. Army Physical Fitness Uniform K. Uniform Requirements - TDY Trip Preparation XIII. Uniform Assembly 108 A. Overview B. Helpful Tips for Assembling the Uniform XIV. Basic First Aid 130 XV. NCO Creed 131 Enclosures Enclosure 1: Enlisted Aide Points of Contact 132

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Enclosure 2: Enlisted Aide Applicable Documents 133 Enclosure 3: Bureau of Labor Statistics Wage Guide 134 Enclosure 4: Enlisted Aide Records Management 139 Enclosure 5: Sample Forms 143 Appendices Appendix A: References 154 Appendix B: Abbreviations 158

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“Good food is the foundation of genuine happiness.”

- Auguste Escoffier

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I. Policy A. Policy Overview

Enlisted aides are authorized for the purpose of relieving general officers of those minor tasks and details which, if performed by the officers, would be at the expense of the officers' primary military and official duties. The duties of these enlisted personnel shall be concerned with tasks relating to the military and official responsibilities of the officers, to include assisting general officers in discharging their official DoD representational responsibilities associated in their assigned positions. B. Summary of Selected Policy Documents The Department of Defense Instruction 1315.09 is the controlling document for the enlisted aide program. The Secretaries of the Military Departments are charged to implement the instruction, and in the Army the Director of the Army Staff has been delegated the responsibility of oversight of the enlisted aide program. The amplifying documents used to manage the enlisted aide program in the Army include a memorandum from the Director of the Army Staff, Army Regulations, Army Pamphlets, and this handbook (Volume I & II). A summary of the most important documents are included below; all applicable documents are listed in Enclosure 2 of this handbook and should be maintained on-site by every enlisted aide. 1. Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 1315.09, Utilization of Enlisted Personnel on Personal Staffs of General and Flag Officers, dated 6 March 2015. Enlisted aides are authorized only if the official and representational duties required by the general officer position warrant enlisted aide support. Enlisted aides are not authorized solely based upon the rank or title of the officer position. Within the Army, the Director of the Army Staff (DAS), in coordination with the General Officer Management Office (GOMO), determines which general officer billet is authorized an enlisted aide. The general officer alone is responsible for determining whether duties assigned to enlisted aides are reasonably connected to the officer's military and official responsibilities. This responsibility may not be delegated. Responsibility for the supervision, direction, and performance of duty of enlisted aide lies solely with the general officer. Such responsibilities shall not be delegated to family members or other persons not directly in the officer's immediate command. Delegation will normally be limited to only those officers serving in the capacity of Executive Officer or Aide-de-Camp. It is, however, appropriate for the enlisted aide to collaborate closely with the spouse to ensure the standards are satisfied for the cleanliness, maintenance, and official functions in the residence.

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Only a general officer who is authorized an enlisted aide may utilize an enlisted aide, unless a general officer who is not authorized an enlisted aide is representing the general officer who is authorized an enlisted aide at a qualifying representational event. The general officer who is authorized the enlisted aide must designate the general officer who is not authorized an enlisted aide as his or her representative and identify the location of the hosted event in writing prior to the event. Enlisted aides will not be shared with or loaned to general officers who are not authorized an enlisted aide. Sharing or loaning of enlisted aides to another general officer who is serving in a position authorized the use of an enlisted aide is permitted to support a qualifying representation event. The enlisted aide is assigned to and supports only the general officer, not a spouse, other family member, or staff of the general, except as outlined below. Due diligence must be exercised to ensure the line of authority remains clear and solely between the general and the enlisted aide. The enlisted aide may support qualifying representation events in the absence of the general officer when: Authorized in writing by the general officer/flag officer (GO/FO) to whom they are assigned and communicated to the enlisted aide(s) prior to the event. The assigned GO/FO determines the role of the designated substitute (e.g., another GO/FO or the assigned GO/FO’s spouse) and ensures that it has a direct connection to the GO/FO’s official duties and responsibilities and that enlisted aide support for the event furthers the interest of the DoD, the Military Service, or the command. This includes qualifying representational events attended by spouses of community leaders (or other government officials, foreign dignitaries, or foreign military officers) with whom the GO/FO is meeting separately in his or her official capacity. When sharing or loaning enlisted aides, the assigned GO/FO has the responsibility to determine that it is a qualifying representational event. 2. Director of Army Staff Memorandum, Enlisted Aide Program, dated 12 June 2015. The DAS executes oversight of the enlisted aide program on behalf of the Secretary of the Army. The primary action officer to execute this responsibility is his assistant XO. The DAS memorandum details roles and responsibilities pertaining to the enlisted aide program. In general, the DAS’ office (supported by the GOMO) develops enlisted aide policy and provides oversight of the program; Human Resources Command (HRC) executes the manning function regarding the program, and Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) recruits individuals into the program, trains enlisted aides and executes quality control of the program.

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No officer may use an enlisted member as a servant for duties that contribute only to the officer's personal benefit or have no substantive connection with the officer's official duties and responsibilities. General officers must occupy government housing to be eligible for the assignment of enlisted aides to their personal staffs. 3. AR 614-200 (Enlisted Assignment and Utilization Management), 11 Oct 2011. Provides guidance on the selection of Enlisted Soldiers for selection, assignment, utilization, classification, and training in support of the Army Enlisted Aide Program. This regulation also provides additional specific guidance for the Army Enlisted Aide Program, and supports DoDI 1315.09.

II. Program Management

A. Program Overview The enlisted aide program is designed to be a common sense, competitive

program selecting the best and brightest enlisted personnel. We will accomplish this goal with a management design that focuses on obtaining quality accessions into the program, training those Soldiers to a high standard, periodically evaluating the enlisted aide while performing his or her duties, and then returning the enlisted aide to the operational force to continue their career progression in their primary military occupational specialty (MOS). Soldiers are then available to rejoin the voluntary program for subsequent tours, bringing the leadership experience and initiative learned in the field Army to this special duty. B. Enlisted Aide Program Process

As the enlisted aide program is a personnel initiative, the lead agency for the program is Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA). The special nature of enlisted aide duty requires close cooperation between HQDA, HRC and TRADOC. That cooperation can only be accomplished if all parties understand the role and responsibilities of their agency: 1. Recruiting: TRADOC is responsible for recruiting, supported by HRC. HRC ensures Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate (EPMD) branches advertise the enlisted aide opportunity on branch home pages, assignment managers are aware of the program. Special emphasis should be made in the logistic branch (food service field). TRADOC advertises the program in food service advanced individual training, NCO Education System, annual culinary arts competitive training events and through Army dining facilities world-wide. HRC is assisted by TRADOC in drafting enlisted aide criteria for selection in Army policy (AR 614-200) and by forwarding interested candidates to HRC.

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All HRC activities are based upon having accurate, documented Z5 designations throughout the Army. 2. Candidate Selection: HRC is responsible for administering a semi-annual Candidate Selection Panel to create a pool for candidates for general officer selection. The number enlisted aide candidates required is determined by HRC in coordination with TRADOC, Assistant Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff, and GOMO. HRC identifies the anticipated vacancies across the next calendar year. Estimates will be based on pending retirement of current enlisted aides, Soldiers leaving the program, YMAV/DEROS of current enlisted aides, anticipated general officer moves and at least a 10% overage to support unforeseen requirements. The President of the Candidate Section Panel will be the DAS. The remaining panel members include the Assistant Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff, the CASCOM CSM, and the HRC enlisted aide professional development NCO (PDNCO). The Senior Enlisted Aide Advisor (SEAA) from TRADOC is the advisor to the panel, and is a non-voting member. The board meets virtually and votes via AKO-Files. Results of the panel are submitted to the HRC PDNCO. 3. Training: TRADOC maintains and resources the enlisted aide training program and courses as appropriate. TRADOC develops the Enlisted Aide Handbook Volume II.

Enlisted aides are Soldiers who have volunteered IAW provisions of AR 614-200, received a favorable background screening, and are graduates of the Advanced Culinary Skills and the Enlisted Aide Training Courses. All nominees selected for assignments have been approved by HRC, are fully qualified and trained, awarded Additional Skill Identifier (ASI) Z5 Enlisted Aide, and are assigned only into billets approved by the DAS. 4. Nomination: Once the pool of candidates is developed, HRC administers an Enlisted Aide Nomination Panel to select a group of enlisted aides for general officer selection. Once an enlisted aide vacancy is confirmed by GOMO or HRC, the HRC PDNCO informs the Nomination Panel of the general officer that needs an enlisted aide, the required report date for that enlisted aide and any other information the PDNCO possesses about the assignment. The panel would make recommendations of a slate (three NCOs of the proper grade) to the PDNCO. The PDNCO verifies the slate (YMAV/DEROS match, Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP), and any other assignment requirements). The Assistant Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff contacts the general officer to offer the general officer the enlisted aide slate. Once an enlisted aide is selected from the slate by the general officer, the PDNCO cuts orders on the selected enlisted aide as per SOP. The Enlisted Aide Nomination Panel includes the Assistant Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff, the CASCOM CSM, and the HRC

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enlisted aide professional development NCO (PDNCO). The SEAA from TRADOC is the advisor to the panel, and is a non-voting member. 5. Assignment/Management: The HRC PDNCO is responsible for assignment and management of enlisted aides. The PDNCO, in conjunction with the basic career field branch of the specific enlisted aide candidate, is responsible to make sure the enlisted aide candidate is properly trained by scheduling the appropriate courses for each enlisted aide. Most importantly, the HRC PDNCO maintains the enlisted aide tour length of 36 months, ensuring that the individual enlisted aide is rotated back to the operational force (not to another specialty billet such as flight steward) after completion of an enlisted aide tour. The intent is to make sure enlisted aides are competitive for promotion in their basic career field at every grade; repetitive assignments in broadening areas (such as enlisted aide to flight steward, flight steward to enlisted aide, or enlisted aide to enlisted aide) will be avoided. Given the unique requirements of the Army Enlisted Aide Program and the limited number of enlisted aides, the Vice Chief of Staff, Army (request through the DAS) may extend an enlisted aide tour of duty by an additional year (to four years of continuous service) to ensure continued support to the officer who requires the enlisted aide for the execution of their duties. Soldiers who complete the minimum assignment time (24 months) in the operational force may request to reapply into the Army Enlisted Aide Program. The enlisted aide’s tour length is timed to coincide with the general officer’s tour. It is the general officer’s responsibility to communicate options to the enlisted aide on their career options. Enlisted aides serving on the general officer’s staff may be reassigned with the general officer through a PCS move provided: a. The general officer so desires; b. The enlisted aide is authorized for the new general officer billet; and c. The enlisted aid has the time remaining on the current enlisted aide tour as indicated above.

III. Interview and Hiring Process Before the Interviewing and hiring process In accordance with DoD Instruction 1315.09, only volunteers will be assigned as enlisted aides. Individuals must also meet the criteria set forth in their Services instructions and regulations. Once a candidate has been identified and meets all requirements he or she is then assigned to the personal staff of a general officer.

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NOTE: Enlisted aides are required to attend both the Advanced Culinary and Enlisted Aide training courses to attain the Z5 skill identifier prior to becoming an eligible enlisted aide hire nominee. A. Nomination Procedures The Assistant Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff may contact general officers or their staff in order to obtain personal information such as required knowledge, skills, and abilities in order to gather relevant information for prospective nominees. This helps to ensure that the general officer recieves an enlisted aide that possesses the charactar traits and required skills needed to fulfill the specific assignment being offered. Factors included during the initial hiring process include: Multiple candidates will be nominated to fill the vacancy. NOTE: The general officer may, in some cases, have a specific candidate in mind for the position. In this case the Assistant Executive Officer to the Director of the Army Staff, HRC and Senior Enlisted Aide Advisor should be contacted and coordinated with for this process. Eligible enlisted aides may be nominated for more than one position at a time depending on available candidates and the general officer’s selection criteria. Enlisted aides may be hired directly from their resume or by interview. Interviews may be conducted in several forums such as telephonic, video teleconferencing, or in person; and, may be conducted by the general officer, chief of staff, or executive officer. The general officer’s spouse may also be present during the interview. It is highly recommended that a face-to-face interview be conducted when possible. A trial period of 1-3 days may also be requested in conjunction with or during the interview process. The requesting general officer’s personal staff (aide-de-camp, secretary, etc.) will coordinate and make all necessary arrangements for the interview. NOTE: The requesting command will fund the face-to-face interview if requested by the general officer doing the hiring. B. The Interview Process As a candidate for an enlisted aide position the face-to-face interview is probably the most important part of the selection process. The job interview is a planned and calculated conversation with a purpose. Keep in mind that when a general officer invites you to an interview, they are indicating an interest in

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bringing you on board. They have already received and gathered a substantial amount of information regarding you as a person and a professional. The interview gives both of you the opportunity to exchange enough information to determine if you are a good "fit" for each other. Think of an interview as a highly focused professional conversation. You should use the limited amount of time you have to learn about the general officer’s needs and discuss the ways you can meet these needs. NOTE: Always remember that being hired as an enlisted aide is really the result and successful intersection of two searches, your desire to become a valued member of a general officer’s staff, and the general officer’s search for the highly qualified enlisted aide that can fulfill their needs. C. Interview Preparation

“Every Battle Is Won Before It Is Ever Fought” Sun Tzu

Always thoroughly prepare prior to the interview. In most cases, your future boss has already scaled the field of potential candidates down to two or three personnel. This means that the interview WILL be the deciding factor. Use the following information to prepare yourself for a successful interview: 1. Knowledge Know the command for which you are being interviewed. It is always wise to know where you are going and what you are getting yourself into prior to packing your bags. Do research on the command, their mission, and the general work atmosphere. Research the general officer for which you are being considered to work. You may ask other enlisted aides who have worked for them in the past or are still currently employed by them. Once you have gathered this information, honestly ask yourself if you are in fact fully qualified to meet the general officer’s expectations. Each enlisted aide position is unique and requires different skills sets. If possible, coordinate with the aide-de-camp before your interview to gain detailed, valuable information that could assist you in your preparation and actual interview. 2. Timeliness Make rock solid preparation for the location and time of the interview. Do not think; know the exact time and location. If you cannot make it to the interview on time the odds are the general officer will have serious doubts as to whether

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you can be relied on for their schedule and needs which leave no room for excuses or error. 3. Appearance It is highly recommended that you wear your ASU (A) unless specifically instructed otherwise. Ensure the uniform is perfectly set up (medal, rank, etc…). Remember that one of your important duties is the care and maintenance of that general officer’s uniform, so impress them with your own sharp looking uniform. Maintain your grooming standards; a fresh haircut and well trimmed nails is a must for an interview. 4. Practice your speaking skills An excellent tool for preparing for an interview is for the candidate to videotape practice interviews with another person. Most people, when they do this, are amazed at some of the bad habits they have of which they were never aware. Observe your demeanor, body language, tone of voice, and clarity when answering specific questions. This is a critical part of interview preparation that most people ignore. Sadly, most people think that they interview well, when in actuality they have poor interviewing skills. Therefore, they lose many opportunities to fill a highly regarded enlisted aide position and never figure out that their interview skills are the weak link in the nomination process. 5. Items to bring to the interview Have a clean, fresh notepad and pen with you. Bring your portfolio and other supporting documents (copies of old NCOERs, awards, etc.). D. The Interview

1. Initial Entry and Greeting Your etiquette and people skills are on display during the actual interview so take note of the following tips: Turn off your phone or, do not even bring it to the interview. Enter the interview room with enthusiasm and energy. Smile, make eye contact, and try to maintain an open posture (line your shoulders up with the shoulders of the person you are meeting). If it seems that the general officer wishes to shake hands try not to have a barrier between you (desk, chair, etc.) and the general officer. Walk around the barrier and shake hands if possible.

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Introduce yourself using your rank, first, and last name as you shake hands. Sit up straight and plant your feet firmly on the floor during an interview. You may think that a relaxed pose will show your confidence, but it shows, instead, a lack of respect or interest.

2. Answering the General Officer’s Questions

Be prepared to answer questions not just related to the duty position itself but also question related to you as a Soldier and a person. Prior to the interview you should write down a list of potential questions and practice answers to these questions. Do not try to memorize the answers. Your answers should come naturally and smoothly, so research and practice enough so that you at least have a solid basis of knowledge related to each potential question. The following tips will assist you in making a great first impression: NOTE: Always ask the general officer if it is ok to takes notes during the interview. a. Maintain eye contact. b. Speak in a clear voice. c. If you need a moment to give a clear answer, do so. d. If you don’t know the answer, write it down and get back to the general officer. e. Always be honest. If you do not know something do not try to talk your way around it.

3. Your Questions for the General Officer

There will come a time in the interview—usually toward the end—when the general officer gives you the opportunity to ask questions. Not everyone takes advantage of this opportunity. Candidates should seize the moment and ask questions related to job expectations as well any unique requirements that the position may require. Asking questions tells the interviewer that you are not only interested in the job, but at that moment, actually planning how to fulfill the requirements of the position. This makes an excellent impression on the interviewer.

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Do inquire about: 1. What specific qualities and skills are they looking for in the job candidate? 2. What are the duty hours of a normal workday? 3. Do they or their dependants have any dietary restrictions or allergies? 4. What amount of entertaining is done at the residence? 5. What are the expectations of meal preparation (breakfast, lunch, dinner)? 6. Will they require assistance during official travel? 7. Are their any other special requirements or uniqiue requests related to the normal duty functions? 8. Special Functions like office calls or hails and farewells? 9. What mode of transportation will I use when performing the job requirements? 10. Training opportunities (related to NCO professional development)? Do not inquire about: 1. Never ask for information you could have easily found with some simple research. 2. Never ask if you can change the job details or the current schedule. 3. Avoid personal questions unless they are directly related to the job and how it should be performed.

4. Time off or additional compensation for duties performed. 4. Live Try-Out

The general officer may ask you to prepare a meal for at their residence as a tryout to view your skills as a culinarian. They most likely will set a date and time for you to prepare this meal. If this is in fact the case, ensure that you set a date and time to go over some menu possibilities with the general officer for the try-out. The general officer may already have a menu chosen for you to prepare, in this case you should review the menu and ask any pertenant questions related to the menu.

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E. Interview Conculsion Exiting the Interview When the interview is over, reiterate your interest in the position (if sincere), make eye contact, shake hands, and thank the general officer for spending time with you. If possible, stop in the outer office to thank the individual who greeted you when you arrived or who escorted you into the interview room. This is not a strategy, just good manners. Keep a smile on your face and your cell phone turned off until you leave the building. F. Interview Follow Up At the conclusion of the interview process, the Enlisted Aide Program Manager will contact you with the results or if he or she requires any other pertinent information. If you are selected for an assignment you should be receiving notification via email or phone call. Also, you should be receiving your hard copy orders with specific instructions (e.g., training in route to your new assignment).

IV. Enlisted Aide Job Requirements It is important to remember that enlisted aides are subject to the same rules, obligations, and workforce needs as other members of the Army. Additionally, they may need to obtain certain documentation required (passport, security clearance) for their assignment with a general officer. For example: A. Duty Workplace Needs (Office) 1. A designated workspace should be established to enable the enlisted aide to perform daily duties (plan menus, schedules, read e-mail). 2. A specific duty phone for the enlisted aide’s duty related use. NOTE: The enlisted aide should not “share” a phone with a general officer or their family members. 3. A computer loaded with basic software (MS Office Suite) for administrative work. 4. Internet access for the computer workstation. B. Personal Military Standards Enlisted aides must be afforded time to maintain their physical fitness and readiness. Many times an enlisted aide will focus solely on the mission of providing for the needs of the general officer and neglect their own needs. At a minimum, an enlisted aide must ensure that the following are included in their duty schedule:

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1. Time to maintain assigned weapon qualification. 2. Current Physical Fitness test. 3. NCOER and required counseling (see par VI). 4. Maintain technical proficiency commensurate with an NCO of their rank and assigned MOS. C. Obtaining a Passport All enlisted aides should have both a personal and government issued passport for official travel requirements associated with their duties. NOTE: Members of the United States military can request a passport free of charge, referred to as a "no-fee" passport, when traveling internationally on official government business. This passport is not valid for personal travel and typically expires after five years. In most cases, personnel may apply online for their passport. Required Documentation for obtaining a passport: 1. Military I.D. 2. Proof of citizenship. 3. Two (2) passport photos (DO NOT have a military uniform on for photo). 4. Official orders of assignment. Steps in the passport process: NOTE: Depending on the assignment and location where the enlisted aide will be applying for the passport, the steps and agency requirements may differ. However, the basic documentation needed will remain the same. 1. Obtain and complete the passport application, available through your Installation Travel Agent or the Department of State website (travel.state.gov). Use a blue or black ink pen to complete each section of the application. Do not sign the application at this time. Below is a listing of the basic forms for obtaining or renewing your passport. There are copies of each form within the enclosures section of this handbook. a. DS-11: Application for a U.S. passport. This form should be used if an applicant never had a U.S. passport or was under the age of 16 at the time the

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previous U.S. passport was issued. This form is also used if an applicant’s previous U.S. passport was issued more than 15 years ago or if the most recent U.S. passport was lost, stolen, or damaged. b. DS-82: U.S. passport renewal application. This form should be used if an applicant is over the age of 16, has a passport issued less than 15 years ago, and uses the same name listed in the most recent U.S. passport. c. DS-64: Statement regarding lost or stolen passport. This form should be submitted with the DS-11 to apply for a new passport book when a valid passport was lost, stolen, altered, or mutilated. 2. Visit your Installation Travel Agent and take your passport application, two passport photos, proof of citizenship, such as a previously issued passport or a government-issued birth certificate, your travel orders, and your military identification card. Provide any necessary information to the passport agent, so s/he can complete Department of Defense form 1056. 3. Present a memorandum for expedited processing signed by a general officer or installation commander to the passport agent in the event that you need the passport in less than 30 days. 4. Discuss with the passport agent how you will receive your passport. While most passports are returned to the passport agent, they are occasionally sent to your embarkation port or address. D. Obtaining a Security Clearance All enlisted aides should obtain or renew their security clearance prior to assuming enlisted aide duties for a general officer. In some cases, their security clearance will need to be upgraded to a higher-level clearance than what they currently possess. It should be noted that you cannot obtain a security clearance for yourself. Your current or prospective unit has to do this for you based on the position and need of the Soldier. For enlisted aides, their duties in most cases will be identified as “sensitive” in nature. Sensitive duties are those duties, which, although they do not include access to classified information, if performed by an untrustworthy individual, could cause harm to the National security. Therefore, obtaining and maintaining a security clearance will be a requirement for the position. Although the process for requesting a security clearance differs slightly among DoD components, the security clearance process has five phases: Pre-Investigation, Investigation, Adjudication, Appeals, and Reinvestigation. For the purposes of this handbook only the first three phases will be covered.

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Types of Security Clearances: 1. CONFIDENTIAL - This refers to material, which, if improperly disclosed, could be reasonably expected to cause some measurable damage to the National security. The vast majority of military personnel are given this very basic level of clearance. This level needs to be reinvestigated every fifteen years. 2. SECRET - The unauthorized disclosure of secret information could be expected to cause serious damage to the national security. This level is reinvestigated every ten years. 3. TOP SECRET - Individuals with this clearance have access to information or material that could be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the National security if it was released without authorization. This level needs to be reinvestigated every five years. Main Phases for Receiving a Security Clearance 1. The first phase is the application process. This involves verification of U.S. citizenship, fingerprinting and completion of the Personnel Security Questionnaire (SF-86). 2. The second phase involves the actual investigation of your background. Most of the background check is conducted by the Defense Security Service (DSS). 3. The third phase is the adjudication phase. The results from the investigative phase are reviewed. The information that has been gathered is evaluated based on thirteen factors determined by the DoD. Some examples of areas they consider are: allegiance to the United States, criminal and personal conduct, and substance abuse or mental disorders. Clearance is granted or denied following this evaluation process. Timeline for Security Clearance Process The time required when obtaining a security clearance depends on several factors, and the type of investigation. In the past three years, DoD has had a significant backlog of security clearances and reinvestigations pending, most especially for TOP SECRET level access. In general, expect a CONFIDENTIAL or SECRET clearance to take between 1 and 3 months. A TOP SECRET will probably take between 4 and 8 months. However, some individuals have been waiting for the results of their TOP SECRET investigation for more than one year. In general, the more there is to investigate, the longer the investigation will take. Expect the investigation to take longer if you have: 1. Lived or worked in several geographic locations or overseas. 2. Traveled outside of the United States.

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3. Relatives who have lived outside of the United States. 4. Background information that is difficult to obtain or involves issues that require an expansion of your case. Obtaining a Security Clearance (never possessed security clearance) NOTE: For detailed information regarding this subject please refer to AR 380-67. Main Steps: 1. Have a duty assignment that requires a security clearance. As an enlisted aide you will have this requirement. Security clearances are granted on a need to know basis when there is a demonstrated need for access to classified information. The employing or sponsoring federal agency (to include military units) decides the level of clearance needed and requests the appropriate level of investigation. 2. Complete the appropriate security questionnaire - usually Standard Form 86 (SF 86). The SF 86 is completed by using the Electronic Questionnaires for Investigations Processing (e-QIP) system. Complete the questionnaire as thoroughly, honestly and with as much candor as possible. Turn your completed form into your unit security officer. 3. Once the forms are received, record checks and fingerprint checks are conducted. Fingerprints may be submitted by hardcopy or electronically. 4. A background check is conducted by a case investigator. Depending on the type of security clearance being requested the length and type of background check will vary. 5. Investigative findings are weighed against existing investigation guidelines for security clearances. Clearance will be granted or denied based on findings from the investigation. The Soldier’s unit will be notified of the results of the investigation. NOTE: The Department of Defense Central Clearance Facility (DoDCCF) at Fort Meade, Md. issues Personnel Clearances (PCL) for most DoD civilians, military personnel, and contractor personnel. Renewing or Upgrading Security Clearance Certain categories of duties, clearance, and access require the conduct of a Periodic Reinvestigation (PR) every 5 years. For specific levels of security clearances a Periodic Reinvestigation (PR) is required every 5 years for a TOP SECRET clearance, 10 years for a SECRET

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clearance or 15 years for a CONFIDENTIAL clearance. However, civilian and military personnel of DoD can be randomly reinvestigated before they are due for a PR. If your security clearance needs to be renewed and/or upgraded then go to your unit security manager and fill out the required documentation (usually SF-85P, SF-86) or Electronic Questionnaires for Investigations Processing (e-QIP). Your security office will submit your forms or e-QIP to the Office of Personnel Management who will conduct an investigation. Interim Security Clearances If the hiring bureau deems it necessary and appropriate, the DSS may be able to grant an interim security clearance (also known as “interim eligibility”) a few weeks after a job candidate has submitted a complete security clearance application package. Formal clearances usually are processed and investigated in less than 90 days. An interim clearance is based on the completion of minimum investigative requirements and granted on a temporary basis, pending the completion of the full investigative requirements for the final clearance. Interim SECRET clearances can be granted in a few days once the clearance granting authority receives a properly completed SF86. Interim TOP SECRET clearances take one or two months longer. NOTE: Interim clearances can be “declined” if unfavorable information is listed on the SF86.

V. Enlisted Aide – Execution of Duties “Duty, Honor, Country. Those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you

ought to be, what you can be, what you will be.” General Douglas MacArthur

A. Overview As an enlisted aide, many of your daily duties will have a visibility from senior officers and officials that is not commonly seen by NCOs in the operational force. Whether you are present or not, much of your work and planning will be on display for many to see (and in some cases judged). In most cases, failure is never an option. Due to the sensitive nature of the work, failure or lack of attention to detail could cause a measure of embarrassment for the general officer or negatively affect an important social event. To minimize even the smallest of errors when performing their duties, an enlisted aide should adhere to the following principles and apply them to everything that they do.

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1. Professionalism. 2. Attention to detail. 3. Effective communication. 4. Time Management. 5. Organization. Applying these principles a. Professionalism. Webster's Dictionary defines professionalism as, "The conduct, aims, or qualities that characterize or mark a profession or a professional person." For the enlisted aide as well as all Soldiers, it encapsulate and defines what we are expected to be. There are five important keys to being a true professional: 1. Character. Good character is something that separates us from one another in both work and social environments. Though there are many traits associated with good character, listed below are some of the more important ones that apply to being an effective enlisted aide. Always be honest in all your interactions with everyone that you know and work with. This is especially important when working with the general officer and their staff. Once your integrity is in question you are no longer going to be effective in your duties. Take responsibility for your actions. Everyone makes mistakes from time to time but owning up to a mistake and making corrective action will be a trait that others appreciate in you. Always do the right thing even when it is the hard thing to do (moral or ethical conflict). Be loyal to the general officer, their family, and their staff. What happens in the work environment should not be discussed to anyone else, and in some cases to no one including the immediate family, unless directed by the general officer. Working in a general’s home means you will be exposed to the normal day-to-day routine of that general officer and their family. This will include the good and the bad. Do not, under any circ*mstances, discuss ANY details regardless of reasons.

2. Attitude. Always be humble, positive, and motivated while executing

your daily duties. Remember, being an enlisted aide is a voluntary duty that may not be a good fit for some service members. However, for those that choose to

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enter this profession they should do so with a positive attitude and take pride in all of their duties.

3. Excellence. Always strive for excellence in everything that you do.

Ninety-nine percent is not acceptable if a hundred percent was possible. 4. Competency. Always seek self-improvement in all of your daily duties.

If you feel that you are weak in a particular area, find ways to improve it through formal training or self-study. Being an enlisted aide does not afford you the luxury of “on the job training.” As an enlisted aide, you should strive to improve the standard every day for all tasks and duties.

5. Conduct. Your conduct, both on and off duty, should be beyond

reproach. Everything you do will reflect on that general officer and the command. When in doubt concerning a personal conduct matter, seek counsel first, to ensure that your actions will not reflect negatively upon the command or that general officer. b. Attention to Detail. Even the smallest of details when executing your duties should be noted to ensure that when that general officer puts on the dress uniform or sits down for a formal dinner they know it is as close to perfect as humanly possible. Taking the extra time to ensure that not a single detail has been overlooked for an important social function of family dinner will always reflect well on the enlisted aide profession. c. Effective Communication. An enlisted aide should always be confident in knowing what the orders and tasks given to them are. Whether they are given by the general officer or their staff they should be received and clarified before they attempt to execute them. Never assume what the order is, KNOW what the order is. If you are not a hundred percent clear on what it is that needs to be done ask and confirm with the appropriate personnel. Effective communication for an enlisted aide can include, but is not limited to, the following personnel or agencies: 1. General officer 2. Personnel on the general officer’s staff 3. Aide-de-Camp 4. Protocol d. Time Management. Effective time management for an enlisted aide is necessary if they are to be efficient in their duties. Ensure that a detailed daily, weekly, and monthly calendar is kept up to date and updated as needed.

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Always prioritize tasks according to the general officer’s needs and execute on or ahead of schedule if possible. If an important task cannot not be completed on time or you do not possess the skills or tools necessary to complete the task inform the general officer or their key staff well before it is due. DO NOT procrastinate when encountering a scheduling problem, always be proactive and handle your duties professionally. If you find yourself always running behind schedule, find out why and what can be done to alleviate the problem. e. Organization. Organization and time management are linked. A disorganized person may work hard and long hours but fall short on completing the mission due to the fact that they focus on issues that could be put off at a later time. Organize your desk, computer, schedule, and personal needs to the highest possible level and then maintain and adjust as needed. An Initial 30 Days: Duty Expectations Checklist located in Enclosure 5 will assist you in meeting the requirements of an enlisted aide. B. Duty Uniform Due to the unique duty requirements and working environment, enlisted aides are authorized to wear distinct uniforms and civilian clothes. The general officer will in most cases inform the enlisted aide as to the duty uniform that they prefer for daily duties as well as special functions. Uniform Authorizations In accordance with DoDI 7000.14-R, Volume 7A, Chapter 29, in addition to any other clothing allowances authorized, enlisted service members directed by competent authority to dress in civilian clothing more than half the time when performing official duty, as a military requirement, may be authorized a civilian clothing allowance (CCA). According to AR 700-84, chapter 8, enlisted aides are not specifically listed. However, due to the unique nature of this special duty and requirements of the enlisted aide program, enlisted aides are authorized to wear a distinctive standardized civilian uniform and civilian clothing based on the geographic location. Although wear of civilian clothing is authorized, standardization throughout the special duty is important.

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The following guidance is provided to standardize the uniform worn by enlisted aides:

Enlisted Aide Uniform Wear Guidance

Trousers Commercial style, Tan (Note 1), Black (Note 1 and 2). Full cut, straight hanging without cuffs. Two rear pockets, two side pockets, zipper and belt loops. Trim-fit with no bunching at waist or bagging at seat; knee and bottom leg widths not altered beyond current specification for the waist size; trouser legs rests on the front of shoe with a slight break in the crease; back of trouser legs will be approximately 7/8 inch longer than the front. No cargo pants or denim jeans.

Shirt, Polo Commercial Polo-style; authorized colors are Black, Red, White, Green, and Blue. Proper fitting, professional in appearance. Long or short sleeve with embroidered 2 to 3 inch US Army or organization logo centered on the upper left chest. First and Last name will be embroidered; with block lettering, upper and lower case on upper right chest; with “Army Enlisted Aide” embroidered ¼ inch below the name; in black thread for the Red, White, and Green shirt; white thread for the Black and Blue shirt. Bottom of the embroidered script will be parallel between the last and second to last button. Personnel may adjust the placement of the embroidered name and logo, up or down, to adjust for different button placards and body configuration. Shirt will be tucked in.

Chef Coat Commercial style white double-breasted chef’s coat (long or ¾ sleeve, French cuff), free of any design or colored trim, with pearlized or cloth covered buttons, straight neck collar, and pocket on left upper sleeve. US Army or organization logo, 2 to 3 inches in diameter, embroidered on the upper left chest with center of logo even with second button. First and Last name will be embroidered in black thread with block lettering, upper and lower case, on upper right chest, centered between the top and second button; certifications will be embroidered in black thread, block lettering, upper case, ¼ inch below the name; reverse US flag, 2 x 3 inches, worn ½ below the right shoulder seam. Non-Subdued rank will be worn centered ¼ inch above the name. (Note 2).

Shoes Black or brown, conservative loafer or oxford style, non-slip, with no logo or brand name. All components to include laces, branding/stitching, upper and midsole must be black. (Note 1, 2) Chef clogs, black, plain, no logo or brand name, are authorized only when wearing the chef coat. (Note 2).

Shirt/Blouse Commercial, style; white, plain. Long sleeve with no prints or stripes. (Note 2)

Vest Commercial, style; black (Note 2)

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Tie/Bow Tie Commercial, style; black (Note 2)

T-shirt White crew neck t-shirt, worn tucked into pants under Chef Coat and shirt/blouse.

Socks Black, plain without design. (Note 1, 2)

Belt Plain black or brown without design or ornate buckle. (Note 1, 2)

Undergarments As prescribed IAW AR 670-1.

Apron White, 30 x 32 inch, waist-style; washable, reusable, white cotton cloth (Note 2); only within the quarters/food preparation/serving area; not to be worn outdoors.

Headgear Army beret, with unit crest; worn with Chef Coat when outdoors. Optional - food handler’s cap or chef toque when in the kitchen/food preparation area.

Handbag Black, IAW AR 670-1, para 27-13

Outer Garment IAW AR 670-1: Gloves, black, leather, unisex, dress, para 15-10 Scarf, black, para 15-10 Sweater, unisex cardigan or pullover, para 15-10 Coat, black, all weather, para 27-8 Coat, Gore-Tex, ACU, digital pattern Windbreaker, black, para 27-30 Optional: Commercial windbreaker, black, similar in design to windbreaker above; with embroidered name and logo.

NOTE 1: Daily Uniform: This is the uniform for wear when performing normal enlisted aide duties. NOTE 2: Entertainment Uniform: These uniform items are authorized for wear when performing special enlisted aide duties (i.e., formal entertaining / food preparation) and may be mixed and matched. NOTE 3: Travel Uniform: When performing general officer travel support, enlisted aides will wear the same uniform as the travel party or as directed by the general officer. NOTE 4: Grooming Standards: Enlisted aides will maintain personal grooming standards IAW AR 670-1. NOTE 5: Clothing and Accessory Standards: Enlisted aides will adhere to the clothing and accessory standards IAW AR 670-1. NOTE 6: Uniform Appearance and Fit Standards: Enlisted aides will adhere to body/physical appearance standards IAW AR 670-1. NOTE 7: Official Military Appointments: Enlisted aides will wear the appropriate military uniform (ACU, ASU, Enlisted Aide uniform) to all military appointments.

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NOTE 8: Enlisted aides will maintain uniforms in accordance with local/Command OPSEC directives. NOTE 9: Detail uniform (i.e., grass cutting, police call, etc.) will be as directed by the command. NOTE 10: Personnel will abide by AR 670-1 in regards to after duty and off-post establishments. NOTE 11: Nametag for vests and shirt/blouse will be as directed by general officer. NOTE 12: Trousers, polo shirt, chef coats, apron, and optional commercial windbreaker will not contain logo or name brand. Application for a civilian clothing allowance will be submitted IAW AR 700-84, Chapter 8, para 8-2 and 8-5. Guidance for requesting a Civilian Clothing Allowance (CCA) through the unit: 1. Enlisted aide or administration office prepares CCA Request Memo. 2. Unit commander signs the memo. 3. Enlisted aide or administration office digitally sends the signed memo directly to the major command/Army Command (ACOM). 4. The major command/ACOM approving authority prepares a memorandum authorizing payment of CCA and forwards it to the local Defense Military Pay Office (DMPO) with a courtesy copy to the requesting unit. NOTE: Refer to AR 700-84, Chapter 8, para 8-6 for procedures for receiving the civilian clothing allowance. NOTE: Enlisted aides are cautioned NOT to purchase uniform items from their personal funds in anticipation of government reimbursem*nt. This procedure constitutes unauthorized expenditure of Army funds, and enlisted aides may have difficulty recouping money from their purchase. For a general or flag officer filling a joint duty position, the assigned enlisted aide will comply with the enlisted aide guidance issued by the Service of the officer, regardless of which service the enlisted aide belongs. C. Duty Hours Due to the unique nature of the enlisted aide duties, the scope and length of the Enlisted Aide’s workday is almost always set by the assigned general

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officer. In some cases the general officer’s chief of staff or aide-de camp will coordinate with the enlisted aide on guidance regarding their work schedule.

VI. Counseling and Professional Development A. Overview Within any command it is important that all members receive a timely initial counseling and regular performance counseling. Effective counseling, especially in a sensitive position on a general officer’s staff, helps to ensure that the staff members fully understand their duties and the expectations of that general officer. For the enlisted aide, the uniqueness of their position can sometimes inhibit professional growth due to the fact that they are outside of the normal NCO operational environment. This makes performance and professional growth counseling vital so that upon finishing their tour as an enlisted aide, they can smoothly integrate back into a leadership role required by a NCO in the operational force. B. Requirements AR 623-3 states that commanders and organizational leaders will establish rating chains and publish rating schemes within their units or organizations in accordance with locally developed procedures and ARs. Established rating chains will correspond to the chain of command or supervision within a unit or organization, regardless of component or geographical location. 1. Rating Scheme The rating scheme for an enlisted aide will be unique from what is normally used throughout the Army for an NCO. In most cases the rater, senior rater and reviewer will be the general officer. In some cases the executive officer or chief of staff will be the rater with the general officer being the senior rater and reviewer. Regardless of the makeup of the rating scheme the enlisted aide should be informed in a timely manner of the rating scheme.

Common Rating Schemes for Enlisted Aides

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2. Initial Counseling a. The primary focus of the initial counseling session is to communicate performance standards to the rated NCO. The initial counseling session should be conducted within the first 30 days of the rating period. Prior to the counseling: 1) Review the NCO Counseling Checklist/Record, DA Form 2166–8–1. 2) Update or review the enlisted aide duty description and fill out the rating chain and duty description on the working copy of the NCOER (DA Form 2166-8, Parts II and III). 3) Review each of the values/responsibilities in Part IV of the NCOER and the values, attributes, skills and actions in FM 22-100. Think how each applies to the enlisted aide and the duty position. 4) Review the actions you consider necessary for a success or excellence in each value/responsibility. b. The initial counseling should include the following: 1) The rating chain. 2) A complete and accurate duty description. 3) The meaning of the values and responsibilities that will be evaluated on the NCOER. 4) The standards for success for the enlisted aide. 5) Areas unique to the specific assignment which may require special attention. All key points discussed during the initial counseling should be recorded on DA Form 2166-8-1 and initialed by the rated NCO. The rater is required to provide a copy of his or her support form, along with the senior rater’s support form, to the rated Soldier at the end of the initial counseling session. The support form usually consists of the DA Form 67-9-1 and any other supporting documentation of the Soldiers' performance for the rating period. NOTE: The DA Form 2166-8-1 should be maintained by the rater until the NCOER has been submitted and approved by HQDA.

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3. Follow up Counseling

DA PAM 623-3 states that counseling will be performed at least quarterly. These performance and/or professional development counseling sessions are critical for both the general officer and the rated NCO to ensure that the duty requirements and expectations of the general officer are being met by the NCO. Too often, a rater will avoid discussing problem areas with the rated NCO and as a result the rated NCO has no indication s/he is not performing to standard. During performance counseling it is recommended that the following be discussed: a. Update the duty description (if needed). b. Add any appointed duties that the NCO has acquired during the rated period. c. Discuss areas where the NCO has performed to standard / exceeded standard. d. Discuss areas that need to be improved or require more focus. This is an ideal opportunity to set goals, identify problems, discuss career development, plan leave, and perform mandatory performance feedback. All key points from the counseling session should be recorded on the DA Form 2166-8-1 and initialed by the rated NCO. C. NCOER The purpose of the NCOER is to enable rating officials to provide HQDA with performance and potential assessments for each rated NCO, particularly for HQDA centralized selection board processes. It also provides valuable information and ensures that sound personnel management decisions can be made and each NCO’s potential can be fully developed. This process requires rating officials to make a conscientious assessment of a rated NCO’s performance in his/her assigned position and potential for increased responsibility and service in positions of higher ranks. NOTE: Every NCOER should be reviewed by the rated NCO’s 1SG, CSM, or SGM to ensure accountability of Soldier’s NCOERs and to supervise performance of junior NCOs. This is in addition to the review by the designated reviewer. D. Enlisted Aide Professional Development Professional development is an integral part of NCO development that should be monitored by leaders (through counseling, mentorship, etc.) and managed by the Soldier. The enlisted aide position, due to its unique duty

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requirements, requires NCOs to develop professionally through their own actions. An important part of the counseling process is for the general officer leader (or a designated member of the general officer’s staff) to address the enlisted aide professional development and to ensure that a plan is developed and followed through by the NCO. Listed below are several areas that should be monitored by the leader: 1. Noncommissioned Officer Education System (NCOES). The purpose of NCOES is to prepare NCOs to lead and train Soldiers who work under their direct supervision. All leaders should ensure that enlisted aides assigned to their staffs have completed required institutional training according to their rank and MOS. Those courses include: Resident Courses. Advanced Leadership Course (ALC), Senior Leadership Course (SLC), and Sergeant Major Course (SMC) Functional Courses. Battle Staff, First Sergeant Course 2. Self Development. Self-development is a planned, progressive, and sequential program followed by NCOs. This program is comprised of individual study, education, research, and professional reading. This area of professional development is especially important to enlisted aides due to the fact that their duties do not represent the norm for NCOs within their MOS career field. Leaders should ensure that enlisted aides under their charge are proactive in keeping up with the most current policies, technical knowledge and equipment that is being used within their primary MOS. One specific area of consideration is the pursuit and attainment of certifications which are annotated on the Enlisted Record Brief (ERB). NCOs should ensure that they have all required documentation (i.e., copy of the certification certificate, and a letter from civilian organization (on their letterhead) that denotes effective and/or termination/ renewal date) and submit to their respective S1 for updating of the ERB. NCOs should also ensure documents are added to Personnel Electronic Records Management System (iPERMS).

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VII. Ethics and Military Customs and Courtesy Conduct of the Enlisted Aide As an enlisted aide, your knowledge of military courtesies, customs, and ethics will play an important part while executing your daily duties and responsibilities. Since your position will require you to be in the presence of top military personnel, high ranking civilians, and foreign dignitaries having this knowledge will only validate to the general officer and his family that they made the correct decision when choosing you as their enlisted aide. A. Ethics – Ethics is defined as the rules or standards governing the conduct of a person or the members of an organization or profession. They guide people in their social interactions both personally and professionally, and in many ways shape the makeup of their daily lives. Remember that ethics are standards by which one should act based on moral principles or values. Values are core beliefs such as duty, honor, and integrity that motivate attitudes and actions. Ethical values relate to what is right and wrong and thus take precedence over non-ethical values when making ethical decisions. An enlisted aide’s moral character and the highest standards of ethical behavior are just as important as organizational and technical skills such as preparing a meal or tending to the maintenance of a general officer's quarters. Some would say that it is in fact the most important attribute of an enlisted aide. While individual morals and values are established at an early age, fine tuned as we grow older, and differ from person to person, ethical standards for an enlisted aide are clearly defined and should be maintained at all time.

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Though required for all Soldiers, the enlisted aide duty position is one that requires great trust and responsibility between the general officer and the enlisted aide due to the fact that it impacts and reflects directly on the general officer for whom they serve. All Soldiers should be familiar with the Army Values and positive character traits that make up what they are. B. Army Values – Values are defined as principles, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. For an individual, they refer to all important beliefs of that person. It is important to note that not all personal values are ethical, and since ethics are moral values in action all soldiers must exhibit certain values that reflect positively upon the United States Army. The established Army Values and how they apply to the enlisted aide profession are as follows: Loyalty Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, the Army, your unit and other Soldiers. Bearing true faith and allegiance is a matter of believing in and devoting yourself to something or someone. In the case of an enlisted aide, loyalty towards that general officer means putting the general officer’s needs ahead of your own regardless of the situation. Your personal schedule, leisure time, and private life come second to the duties you perform as an enlisted aide. Duty Fulfill your obligations. Doing your duty means more than carrying out your assigned tasks. Duty means being able to accomplish tasks as part of a team and as an enlisted aide you are one part of a much larger team that supports the general officer in their daily activities. Enlisted aides work long hours, and work diligently, while exhibiting the skill, temperament, and reliability of a true professional. Respect Treat people as they should be treated. In the Soldier’s Code, we pledge to “treat others with dignity and respect while expecting others to do the same.” A general officer’s daily schedule is usually tightly controlled and regimented. An enlisted aide ensures that the small details like uniforms and dining arrangements are taken care of prior to an engagement. All the duties of an enlisted aide are done out of respect for the senior position of authority that the general officer holds. Selfless Service Put the welfare of the Nation, the Army and your subordinates before your own. Selfless service is larger than just one person. In serving your country, you are doing your duty loyally without thought of recognition or gain. The basic building block of selfless service is the commitment of each team member to go a little further, endure a little longer, and look a little closer to see how he or she

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can add to the effort. Enlisted aides always go the extra mile to ensure that all daily tasks are completed to near perfection. For the general officer, small details can have a big impact on their daily interactions with other leaders and duties. Honor Live up to Army Values. Honor is a matter of carrying out, acting, and living the values of respect, duty, loyalty, selfless service, integrity and personal courage in everything you do. Enlisted aides must remember that are an important member of that general officer’s staff and that their actions can reflect directly on that general officer. A simple error in dining arrangements or protocol may negatively affect other seniors or dignitaries that the general officer is hosting. Integrity Do what’s right, legally and morally. Integrity is a quality you develop by adhering to moral principles. It requires that you do and say nothing that deceives others. As your integrity grows, so does the trust others place in you. The more choices you make based on integrity, the more this highly prized value will affect your relationships with family and friends, and, finally, the fundamental acceptance of yourself. As an enlisted aide, you must have the complete trust of the general officer that you support. You will be entrusted with both personal and professional details of the general’s life that are known by few. Doing what is right regardless of your situation is a cornerstone of your obligation to that general officer. Personal Courage Face fear, danger or adversity (physical or moral). Personal courage has long been associated with our Army. With physical courage, it is a matter of enduring physical duress and at times risking personal safety. Facing moral fear or adversity may be a long, slow process of continuing forward on the right path, especially if taking those actions is not popular with others. You can build your personal courage by daily standing up for and acting upon the things that you know are honorable. C. Morals Morals define personal character, while ethics stress a social system in which those morals are applied. For the enlisted aide, your personal character will be interpreted and viewed by the general officer, their dependants, and those whom they interact with on a daily basis. Being an enlisted aide means conducting yourself at all times so as to bring credit upon you and the general officer with whom you serve. Listed below are qualities of a person who adheres to high moral standards. All Soldiers

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should review these character traits and work to incorporate them into their own persona. Attentiveness Commitment Confidence Cooperation Courage Decisiveness Diligence Efficiency Fairness Honesty Integrity Loyalty Patience Persistence Punctuality Respect Responsibility Self-control Tolerance Trustworthiness Truthfulness D. Military Customs and Courtesies When you display military customs and courtesies in various situations, you demonstrate to yourself and others your commitment to duty, honor, and country. Every branch of the armed services has a variety of characteristic customs established long ago and still in use today. Enlisted aides should always consult with local protocol and conduct their own research regarding customs and courtesies of other Services as well as other countries. A custom is a social convention stemming from tradition and enforced as an unwritten law. Customs include such things as responding to a senior officer’s presence, recognizing the officer’s rank or position of honor, correctly using military titles, saluting appropriately and reporting correctly. A courtesy is a respectful behavior often linked to a custom. A military courtesy is such behavior extended to a person or thing that honors them in some way. Military courtesies are the outward signs of your respect for your Nation, your flag, your comrades, and our country’s fallen heroes. They engender mutual respect, good manners, politeness and discipline. E. Personal Conduct As stated in section V Enlisted Aide – Execution of Duties of this handbook, one important aspect of the enlisted aide profession is to protect the privacy of the general officer and their family. Always keep this in your thoughts, both on and off duty, regardless of with whom you are interacting. Enlisted aides must maintain their personal and professional conduct in and out of uniform at all times. If not you can easily bring shame or dishonor to the general officer and their family. Truthfulness is required for this line of duty and is just one of many great qualities to encompass as an enlisted aide.

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Caring is an essential element of good personal conduct. Respect. To treat people with dignity, to honor privacy, and to allow self-determination are critical in a government of diverse people. A lack of respect leads to a breakdown of loyalty and honesty within a unit or command. Personal Appearance. Enlisted aides should always ensure that their appearance exemplifies professionalism to the Army NCO Corps and the enlisted aide profession. They should always discuss with the general officer what uniform should be worn for each specific occasion when executing their duties. Both on and off duty the enlisted aide should dress in a manner that will always represent their profession with honor. F. Interaction with General Officers and Their Guests The knowledgeable enlisted aide’s conduct will, at all times, be presented in such a manner that will cause the least embarrassment, discomfort, and inconvenience to those around. An enlisted aide, in social settings, should never forget this principle of consideration for others. During your career as an enlisted aide, you will meet hundreds of people, both officially and socially. The impression that you make on all these people depends very much on your social conduct in all aspects: politeness, proper clothing, respect for seniors, table manners, courtesy to ladies, and correct correspondence. Communication Skills Communication is the activity of conveying meaningful information. The enlisted aide should always communicate in a clear, direct, yet polite manner to avoid any misunderstandings or disrespect. Communication requires a sender, a message, and an intended recipient. The communication process is complete once the receiver has understood the sender. Body language is a form of non-verbal communication, which consists of body posture, gestures, facial expressions and eye movements. Humans send and interpret such signals almost entirely subconsciously. The enlisted aide should be conscious about their body language and what it is saying. Body language at the work place should be a combination of casual and conservative body language. Casual is more relaxed, less formal, and allows for more personal expression and honesty. This is best when dealing with the general officer’s spouse and family members. Conservative is formal and reserved, often very structured and regimented. This is best used when dealing in official and formal settings.

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Interpersonal Skills Interpersonal skills are the skills that a person uses to interact with other people. These skills are sometimes referred to as people skills or communication skills. Interpersonal skills involve using skills such as active listening and speaking. Interpersonal skills reflect how well you communicate with someone and how well you behave or carry yourself. Proper military customs and courtesy should be addressed whenever an enlisted aide is interacting with a general officer and their guests. Enlisted aides should note the following when in their presence: Three of the most important expressions in your entire vocabulary are “please,” “thank you,” and “you are welcome.” Always use “Sir” or “Ma’am” when addressing military officers, civilian guests, and the general officer’s dependents. If the guest is a person of high position within a government, then ensure that you research their proper title and address this with the general officer prior to an engagement. An example would be a Congressman or Senator. They may be addressed as Congressman (last name), or Senator (last name). However, in most cases you may address them as Mr. / Mrs. / Ms. (last name). When addressing the President of the United States or Vice-President of the United States use the following: Mr. President or Mr. Vice-President. Unconfirmed cabinet-level officials; acting secretary, secretary ad-interim, and secretary designates (and corresponding attorneys general) are addressed as “The Honorable (name).” If there are foreign dignitaries ensure that you research and cover all details pertaining to customs that may be important when addressing a person from another nation. Contact the general officer’s protocol personnel to check on these matters. NOTE: Though it is admirable to try to learn a little of the language of a foreign visitor, be very careful of using it in conversation unless you are absolutely sure of its meaning and that it will be received in the way in which it was intended. Many people have made some embarrassing mistakes when it comes to communicating using a foreign language that they are not proficient in while in both social and official occasions. Additional Notes Concerning the use of Sir or Ma’am A Soldier, in addressing a military superior, uses the word “Sir” or “Ma’am” as does a courteous civilian speaking to a person whom he wishes to show

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respect. In the military service, however, the matter of who says “Sir or Ma’am” to whom it is clearly defined; in civilian life it is largely a matter of discretion. The proper, natural, and graceful use of “Sir” or “Ma’am” is something that comes with training and experience in the Army. Some fall into the habit easily; others must work at it. It is used in speaking either officially or socially to any senior. The word is repeated with each complete statement. “Yes” and “No” should not be used in speaking to a superior without “Sir” or “Ma’am.” On the other hand, “Sir” or “Ma’am” should not be said with every other breath to the point of obsequiousness. In official dealings between officers who know each other well it is proper to use the words, with less frequency. G. Interaction with the General Officer’s Spouse Do not call spouses by first names even if they ask you to do so. Acknowledge a spouse’s presence when s/he enters a room. H. Telephone Etiquette The enlisted aide will take the responsibility of being the point of contact for the general officer’s quarters. Inherent in that is the volume of telephone traffic they will need to manage. While it is important to be polite and professional, it is equally important to safeguard the privacy of the general officer and his or her family. By the same token, just as important is the documentation and delivery of messages. Traditionally, we answer the telephone with a greeting that leaves little doubt as to whom the caller has reached. In some instances, this could be viewed as a security breach. For instance, “Good morning, you have reached the quarters of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Green, Sergeant Smith speaking, how may I help you sir or ma’am?” Think about how much information was just put out? Suggested phone greeting: “Good morning, Sergeant Smith speaking, how can I help you?” This greeting is polite and short. No valuable information was given out. So far, the caller does not know if he reached an office or a private residence. From here the enlisted aide can use their best judgment to answer the caller’s questions without giving away personal or sensitive information. NOTE: It is recommended that an SOP be established for taking messages. Messages should capture: who called; when (time and date); the message; and

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what action is requested. Establish a specific place for posting messages so they can be easily seen.

VIII. Enlisted Aide Duties - Household Management As the household manager, you are entrusted with the care, cleanliness, and maintenance of the general officer’s quarters. These quarters are part of our top leaders’ traditions and must be valued, protected and maintained with meticulous attention to detail at all times. An enlisted aide’s personal commitment to their proper stewardship is critically important. The cost to operate, maintain, and renovate these quarters is closely watched by Congress and your services departments, so you must do the same. Your involvement in quarter’s management and maintenance decisions is essential to safeguarding the resources and reputation of the military. Sufficient funds are generally authorized and available to maintain these quarters. Many of the general officer's quarters (US Army) have been privatized, placing them under the ownership and management of private companies. Even for these privatized homes, we are required to report to Congress each general or flag officer’s quarters whose total operations, maintenance, and repair costs exceed $50,000 per year. For government-owned quarters, the total expense for Operation, Maintenance and Repair should not exceed $35,000 per year. Enlisted aides should work closely with the government-owned Housing Office Representative and the Public-Private Venture (PPV) Property Managers to ensure the most effective and efficient use of those funds and to participate in the development of a long-term maintenance and repair plan NOTE: Maintenance of Historic Quarters. If your general officer lives in quarters which are eligible for or listed on the National Register of Historic Places, then the maintenance and repair of these quarters must be sensitive to the historic character of the home, and coordinated with the installation Cultural Resources Manager and the State Historic Preservation Office. Facilities Officers and PPV Property Managers must be mindful of historic preservation guidelines and local regulatory requirements during development and execution of renovation projects and long-term maintenance plans.

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A. Household Cleaning and Maintenance Schedules The quarter's operations are very important responsibilities. Maintaining a strict schedule will help in your operational day to day duties. There are many tasks to be performed and time management is essential. The enlisted aide is required to clean and maintain the general's quarters while properly preparing uniforms and nutritious meals. NOTE: Cleaning does not include making beds, picking up or organizing personal effects, or other duties that contribute solely to the personal benefit of the general officer and family members. For an enlisted aide, time management procedures help you become more organized in the execution of your duties. By keeping track of your time, you will take a more logical and efficient approach towards your duties. Remember that time management is flexible and adaptable. Your time management schedule should be adjusted according to the weekly or monthly work load, social activities, meetings, and needs of the general officer. NOTE: It is appropriate for a general officer's spouse, if so desired by the spouse, to closely collaborate with the enlisted aide to ensure the standards and schedules are satisfied for the care, cleanliness, and maintenance of the quarters. 1. Daily schedules. Daily schedules should capture your daily responsibilities that ensure all required cleaning and maintenance is executed efficiently and in a timely manner. Daily Schedule Example

0700 - 0730 Gather and sort uniforms for washing or laundering 0730 - 0830 Prepare and serve general officer’s breakfast 0830 - 0900 Dusting 0900 - 0915 Check soap, toilet paper and other supplies in bathroom,

change towels if necessary 0915 - 1000 Sweep/vacuum/mop floors in high-use areas 1000 - 1015 Empty trash and garbage containers 1015 - 1045 Vacuum all rugs and carpet 1045 - 1145 Prepare and serve general officer’s lunch 1300 - 1330 Police exterior of quarters 1330 - 1430 Basic grounds maintenance

NOTE: Most general officers have these lunch and breakfast, especially breakfast, consistently at the same time during the day. Enlisted aides should adjust the daily schedule as needed to incorporate the time needed to prepare, serve, and clean up for these meals.

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2. Weekly schedules. Weekly schedules should capture the responsibilities that, though not required every day, compliment your daily duties in ensuring that the cleaning and maintenance of the general officer’s quarters is maintained at a high standard. Weekly Schedule Example 1. Dust all surface areas and objects, including pictures, mirrors, light fixtures, and light bulbs 2. Deep clean entire bathroom(s) 3. Deep clean entire kitchen and appliances 4. Wash out and sanitize garbage cans 5. Deep clean the sun room, library or study 6. Deep clean the laundry room 7. Deep clean the enlisted aide’s office if available 3. Monthly, Quarterly schedules. Monthly and quarterly schedules should capture those tasks that do not require frequent cleaning and maintenance. These duties include items that should be maintained even though they may not be noticed at first glance. Monthly / Quarterly Schedule Example

1. End of month report 2. Test alarms (security/intrusion) 3. Clean/dust lampshades 4. Clean/dust light fixtures 5. Dust/vacuum book shelves 6. Dust blinds, mini-blinds, shades, door tops, and other hard-to-reach

areas 7. Clean all baseboards

4. Semi-Annual or Annual schedules. Semi-Annual and Annual schedules should capture your yearly responsibilities. This schedule not only maintains areas, but alerts the enlisted aide to potential upkeep and maintenance for the household. Items and/or areas may be in need of replacement or major maintenance, so it is important to place items within this schedule that could go unnoticed during the normal workweek. Semi-Annual / Annual Schedule Example

1. Spring cleaning, furnace inspection 2. Clean and polish silver, brass items 3. Clean chandeliers, ceiling fans 4. Clean the basem*nt and garage 5. Move and clean underneath all appliances in kitchen 6. Organize your official documents and records and discard out-of-date

ones

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7. Update household inventories 8. Wax furniture

NOTE: When planning on taking personal leave it is highly recommended that you inform the following individuals to ensure that the maintence and cleaning schedule is followed during your absence. 1. Fellow enlisted aides 2. Maintenance 3. Contractors 4. Housing office B. Maintenance - Reporting Damage While cleaning and maintaining the quarters, constantly look for damaged or deteriorating equipment to include the quarters (house) itself. Being able to identify an area or item that has been damaged or is not working properly early can prevent serious problems in the future. During their daily duties, an enlisted aide should look for the following regarding damage and maintenance to household furnishings and the residence: Check all furniture for scratches, torn fabric, or excessive wear. Inspect hardwood and tile floors for chips, cracks, or discoloration. Check carpeting and rugs for stains, tears, or excessive wear. Inspect all appliances for damage and ensure that they are operating at peak efficiency. Check walls, floor molding, and crown molding for any damage top include discoloration and cracks (settling). Observe ceilings and looks for signs of water leaks. Ensure all doors and windows open and close properly. Checks for cracks or leaks in and around doors and windows. Look for any type of mold buildup both inside and outside of the residence. Check roof of residence for missing shingles or tiles. Check gutters to ensure they are secured to the residence and not clogged. Inspect all items, equipment, and appliances for rust.

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NOTE: This list is not all inclusive. Enlisted aides should always do a morning walkthrough both inside and outside of the residence and note any deficiencies. Report any decay or damage to NCOIC of quarters or authorized installation housing personnel. Enlisted aides should track these deficiencies using a work order log and ensure that they are followed through. See Enclosure 5 for an example of this form. When areas of the residence are in need of repair or service the enlisted aide should submit a Housing Service Request online or in person at the housing office. All repairs and service request documentation should be kept on file by the enlisted aide. C. Maintaining Linens The cleaning of linens in a general officers residence refers in most cases to cloth napkins, table cloths, and doilies. The cleaning of linens such as bed sheets is usually not an assigned duty of an enlisted aide. The general officer usually establishes “off limits” areas within the residence and the bedrooms are usually classified as such and will not be maintained by the enlisted aide. Generally, linens are cleaned using a washer set on a delicate cycle, or they are sent to the installation laundry service if available. Ensure linens are not damaged during cleaning and pressing process if they are done in quarters. Linens used for formal meals should be stored separately from those used every day. Only clean, dry linens should be stored. Washing Linens Follow these simple suggestions for proper care of your bed, bath, and table linens, and you will prolong their life and preserve their appearance. Always maintain the original linen labels and refer to manufacturer's cleaning instructions prior to washing an item(s). Pre-treat all stains prior to wash. This allows for longer contact time for soil removal with a specific chemical designed for a specific stain. Wash in HOT water and detergent, if linen is pre-shrunk. If you do not know whether the linen is pre-shrunk, use COLD water and cold water detergent. Avoid chlorine bleach and enzyme products when washing or treating linens. Use fabric softeners according to directions, but use only every three or four washes. Waxy buildup from softeners can deteriorate the towel fibers over time and reduce their absorbency.

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Pressing (ironing) Linens Always separate linens by category (napkins, tablecloths, and doilies) prior to ironing, this will make it easier to organize and iron large amounts of linen in a short amount of time. Linen requires the iron to be on the highest heat setting; you must be careful as linen can scorch. Turn the garment inside out to protect it from the heat of the iron and place a buffer fabric between the iron and the linen; a pillowcase or a sheet works perfectly. If the iron trickles water onto the linen, iron it immediately so the water evaporates and does not cause a water stain. Additionally, be careful with wrinkle release sprays as some can stain linen. Test the spray on an inconspicuous spot on the fabric to determine if it will be safe to use. Iron in only one direction; moving back and forth causes more wrinkles. Pushing forward works well. Once ironing is completed, fold the linens and store according to the below listed instructions. NOTE: Check with the general officer or spouse for any special folding requirements. Linen Storage Ensure that linens are properly dried prior to storing them. As far as ironing is concerned, a general rule is to iron linens just before you are ready to use them. Do not iron them if you plan to store them for a long time. If you do plan to store things for any length of time, store them clean and loosely rolled in acid free tissue or in white cotton. Storing them ironed can cause creases to form or crack. Do not store them in plastic. Do not store them starched, which can attract moths which will eat the starch along with any fibers that get in their way. Separate everyday linens from those that are used for formal meals. Place linens in appropriate storage areas by category. Do not store them in wooden drawers, chests, trunks, suitcases or closets where the fabric can touch the wood. Wrap them loosely in clean cotton.

D. Maintaining Lead Crystal General Tips on Cleaning Lead Crystal Store crystal where it won't touch other items. Do not store crystal glasses upside down as it can put stress to the rim, which is very delicate. When carrying crystal, carry pieces one at a time rather than carrying as a bunch by the stems. If possible, place crystal in a sturdy safe carrying container

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whenever moving large amounts of crystal or from the residence to another location. If crystal breaks and you can save it, use a clear-drying epoxy that was made just for glass and glue it back together. Then set in the sun for a bit to help the bonding process. Dust can act as an abrasive and can "scratch" the surface. Make sure you only clean with a mild detergent and use a lint free cloth for drying. For glasses with gold rims or an edge design, never soak in solutions containing ammonia. Stick to using a mild detergent only. Washing Crystal Crystal glasses, ornaments and pieces should not be washed in the dishwasher since they are at risk of damage from the high heat and harsh detergent. Place a rubberized pad in the bottom of the washing sink to prevent crystal from impacting on the bottom of the sink. Place each piece in the sink separately and wash it individually. Use soap if possible, or select a mild, nonabrasive detergent and reduce the amount by half. A capful of vinegar may be used in the wash water to assist in the cleaning process. Wash the inside and outside of crystal separately. When the interior and exterior surfaces of crystal are washed together, the action creates pressure that eventually leads to cracks. Do not use ammonia on crystal that has a decorative trim; it can fade the color. NOTE: Never hold stemware by the stem and twist the bowl, it will likely snap the stem off. Rinsing Crystal Dip crystal, one piece at a time in warm rinse water. It is important to always use just-warm water, not hot. And never rinse with cold water. Extreme temperatures can cause cracks or breakage. Prior to final drying, place rinsed crystal upside down on a soft cloth to drain and avoid chipping. Drying Crystal Always dry crystal with a lint-free towel. Lint clogs engraved ornamentation. For best results use a tightly woven towel to dry crystal

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ornamented with cut decoration, a towel that will not scratch the surface of crystal. Lift each piece of crystal by the stem. Dry crystal one piece at a time by holding its cup firmly to ensure it does not slip out of your hands. Place dried crystal on a flat surface. Water leaves a permanent mark. Before crystal is put away, hold each piece to the light, check for water spots, and wipe them off immediately. Water spots can leave permanent marks. Storing Crystal Separate crystal according to use. Place the crystal in its designated storage area in the upright position. Stand stemmed glasses or tumblers with a particularly heavy base upright, not upside down. Ensure that crystal is stored in a neat, orderly manner, and not touching each other. E. Window Cleaning Use the appropriate cleaning supplies to remove all spots and dirt from panes and picture windows. Remove all dust and lint from the frames and window sills. General Cleaning Tips Use a squeegee if possible on larger windows. Wipe window with a sponge first if there is excess dirt or residue visible. Spray the window with a high quality cleaner. Wipe the glass clean with soft paper towels, window wipes, newspaper, or a squeegee (preferred tool). Complete the drying process with a lint free cloth. Warning: DO NOT mix any chemicals together; use only one in each washing solution! Ammonia solutions and solutions containing alcohol or bleach should be handled carefully because they may damage painted, lacquered, and varnished surfaces and will cause severe damage. When cleaning window panes and or glass do not: 1. Scrub glass with dirty cloth. 2. Work on windows when the sun is shining directly on them. 3. Use soap, ever. 4. Sit on window sill with your body extended outside the window to clean exterior windows.

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F. Ceiling, Walls, Baseboards, and Rails Dust and spider-webs present a constant cleaning requirement and inspections for them should be included in your daily walk through of the quarters. Chair rails, baseboards, and window sills will stand out when regularly maintained. Ceiling Dusting Use a cloth-covered broom or other appropriate equipment to dust entire ceiling, especially in all corners and around light fixtures. A long handled portable vacuum cleaner may be used (avoid touching the walls or ceiling with the attachment). Using a Preservative on chair rails, baseboards and window sills: 1. Carefully apply approved wax, lemon oil or polish. 2. Buff or rub wax or polish in thoroughly. 3. Be sure to wipe up excess wax or polish to avoid dust-catching, slippery surfaces. G. Light Fixtures

Regularly dust light fixtures. Carefully clean light bulbs by unscrewing them and allowing them to cool

and then clean with an appropriate cleaner, dry completely to get a brighter glow. Periodically remove the parts of fixtures that can be removed for deep

cleaning. Wash in warm, mildly soapy water. Rinse fixture parts and dry completely. Replace cleaned fixture parts properly. Always ensure light fixtures work properly upon final assembly.

H. Maintaining Bathrooms If the bathroom being used is part of the community area, replace soiled towels and washcloths with clean ones. Empty and clean all wastebaskets. Remove dust from baseboards, windows, and draperies. Clean and dust specified areas with the proper equipment, solutions, and techniques. Remove mildew and mineral deposits from ceramic tile.

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Bathroom Accessories 1. Check for dust on doors, baseboards, windows, window sills, and draperies/curtains.

2. Remove dust with damp cloth or other approved dusting/cleaning

solution. 3. Check mirrors for smudges, stains, and other marks. 4. Spray mirrors with appropriate glass cleaner. 5. Wipe mirrors with dry, lint-free cloth or paper.

Sink

1. Use damp cloth or sponge with an approved commercial cleaner. 2. Wash entire area around the item. 3. Rinse the sink thoroughly. 4. Dry the sink with a clean (lint-free) dry cloth.

Toilet Bowl 1. Use damp cloth or sponge with an approved commercial cleaner.

2. Clean the entire area, inside and out. 3. Rinse item thoroughly. 4. Dry item with clean (lint-free) dry cloth.

Mildew 1. Use chlorine bleach (1 cup to each gallon of water), or another approved commercial cleaner to wash mildew areas.

2. Use a small stiff brush to scrub the area. 3. Rinse thoroughly. 4. Dry completely.

Floor Areas 1. Use soap, detergent, or another approved commercial cleaner mixed with the proper amount of water to clean floors.

2. Using mop, wet the floors thoroughly with solution.

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3. Mop in corners, around doors and around toilet bowls. 4. Change water solution when necessary. 5. Wring out excess water from mop. 6. Dry mop floor completely. 7. Let the floor air dry.

Tissue Rollers and Dispensers Check tissue rollers/dispensers. Fill tissue rollers/dispensers as necessary. I. Floors – Carpet, Hardwood, Tile Carpet Maintenance Operate the vacuum cleaner and carpet shampooer according to the manufacturer's instructions and requirements. Maintain and clean carpets using the appropriate cleaning supplies to remove any spots, stains or odors. Vacuuming the Carpet 1. Use slow forward and backward motions, vacuum entire carpet area.

2. Slow movements result in the most effective soil removal. 3. Vacuum slower and more often in "traffic lanes."

4. Carpet becomes soiled at an uneven rate due to the "traffic lanes" accumulating more soil than the surrounding carpet. Spilled Substances or Wet Spots

1. Blot up any liquid with a paper towel or cloth. 2. Dampen a sponge or cloth in lukewarm water or approved commercial cleaner for the particular spot or stain. WARNING: Never pour a solvent or undiluted cleaner directly on the carpet/rug.

3. Sponge the stain with the dampened sponge or cloth. NOTE: Do not scrub roughly; wipe and pat to avoid disturbing the pile. A soft, bristled brush or fingertips may be used to work the cleaning solution into the soiled carpet area.

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4. Use another clean, dry cloth; wipe up excess moisture.

5. If necessary, place another clean, dry cloth over the spot and stand on the cloth for about 30 seconds.

6. Remove the cloth. 7. Repeat steps 2 through 6 until spot is removed from carpet or rug.

NOTE: Club soda or tonic water used directly on spots and wiped dry may remove the spots completely. Carpet Cleaning - Room Preparation Follow the steps below to prepare a room for carpet cleaning. 1. Remove furniture and area rugs from room, or place to one side of the room until the other side is vacuumed, cleaned and dried. 2. If furniture must be left in place, protect base of furniture legs by placing small plastic bags under/around legs and secure in place with masking tape or rubber bands. Shampooing the Carpet 1. Read and follow manufacturer's instructions carefully when using an approved commercial cleaner and shampooer to clean carpet or rug. Maintain a file folder with manufacturer's suggestions for cleaning and maintaining carpets.

2. Allow the carpet to dry completely. 3. Vacuum the carpet to remove any carpet fibers that may have been

loosened. 4. Return furnishings to their original location.

NOTE: When it is necessary to move furniture to open a room up for a function, ice placed into the divots left by the furniture will revive the carpet and bring the pile back in 12 to 24 hours. Hardwood Floor Maintenance Floor Dusting. Dust floors by mopping entire area with dampened mop to remove dust and other loose particles. A vacuum may be used and is especially helpful with pet hair, but it must be set to its lowest setting so it will not rise or blow dust. It is preferred to use a push broom or “Swiffer” to clean the floor, especially if the area is large.

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Buffing a Wood Floor. It may become necessary to polish/buff the floor to bring back its luster. If you have a buffer available, read and follow manufacturer's instructions carefully. As you polish the floor, let your motions follow the grain of the wood. Remove spills promptly with a damp cloth. J. Cleaning Furniture All designated items (within the official entertaining area) must be cleaned with proper supplies, cleaning solutions, and equipment. The appropriate techniques must be followed in cleaning furniture. Always maintain labels from furniture and refer to manufacturer's instructions when cleaning. Check with host/hostess for preferences of polishes, waxes, or oils to be used on furniture. Dusting Furniture Oiled and treated dusters should only be used on furniture polished with an oil polish. Never spray polish directly on furniture. Use a clean, dry, hemmed duster to remove dust from furniture. Polishing Wooden Furniture

1. Select and use the appropriate polish, wax or oil for the particular furniture.

2. Apply polish, wax or oil sparingly; rub with the grain of the wood using a soft cloth.

3. Rub with a soft cotton flannel cloth to polish.

NOTE: Too much polish, whether oil or wax, makes the polishing job difficult. K. Pre-Termination of Quarters Enlisted aides are also required to assist the general officer in scheduling a pre-termination inspection of the quarters when moving out. This inspection will determine the extent of maintenance needed between occupancy in terms of duration and cost. Prior to the housing inspection, the enlisted aide should note the following: 1. Any damage to the residence to include floors, walls, appliances, cabinets and any other major areas of the residence. If any damage is found place a workorder through the proper agency and ensure that it is repaired prior to the inspection. 2. Ensure that all areas are cleaned to the standard set by the housing authority (they should provide the enlisted aide with a inspection checklist).

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3. Accountability of all items that were signed for by the general officer when they initially occupied the residence. 4. Check the outside of the residence and ensure that the grounds have been properly maintained. Communication between you, the general officer and the Housing Office is vital. When preparing for the termination of quarters the enlisted aide should ensure that all cleaning and needed maintence prior to the housing inspection is done so that a smooth transition out of the quarters can be made. Any areas of concern should be communicated to the general officer and the housing authority PRIOR to the final inspection. L. Household Property Inventory/Accountability The general officer’s quarters that you will be working in is probably going to be filled with a combination of personal and government furnishings. General officers of special command positions are entitled to residential housing with amenities appropriate to the level of official entertaining. These amenities include special allowances for items such as table linen, dishes, glassware, silver, and kitchen utensils. The Housing Office Representative will have detailed information regarding the issue of these amenities. Examples of special amenities could include special china sets and glasses that would be used for special occasions with offical visitors. Additionally, furniture and additional appliances may be included in the list of additional items issued and maintained in the residence. It is important to note that the enlisted aide will only sign for government issued items from the housing authority and the unit supply function. They will not sign for the general officers personal property. The two main supply functions that will issue items to the enlisted aide are: 1. Local Supply - Command napkins, general office supplies. 2. Local Housing Authority – Offical Army china, silverware, some major furnishings (dinner table). Physical Inventory Enlisted aides should keep a detailed file on hand of all items that they are issued for use in the general officer’s residence. In most cases they will sign for the items using a DA Form 3161 or an offical form from the post housing authority. All records should be kept until final clearing of the residence is finalized.

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NOTE: A hard copy or electronic copy of the original documentation will be maintained in a readily available location during the applicable retention period to permit the validation of information pertaining to the item such as the purchase cost, purchase date and cost of improvements. The enlisted aide should have scheduled property inventories planned for each calendar year. Properly planned and executed physical inventories and location surveys serve to continuously improve accountable property record accuracy. Physical inventories may take different forms, including wall-to-wall, recurring, sampling, and “by exception.” The amount of physical property that the enlisted aide is responsible for will in most cases be a reletively small amount. With this in mind enlisted aides should conduct a 100 percent inventory every year. Classified or sensitive property (has historic value) should be inventoried every quarter. NOTE: A minimum 98 percent physical inventory accuracy rate shall be achieved and maintained. And 100 percent accuracy for classified or sensitive property (for the enlisted aide it could include items that have a historic value to them). Missing or damaged Items When an item has been identified as mising or broken the enlisted aide should inform the agency that originally issued the item and fill out any necessary forms explaining the reason for the loss. In most cases it will be for a broken or damaged piece of china or crystal. The housing authority will usually replace the item if it is on hand locally or order it through the supply chain. Enlisted aides should report broken or damaged items to the general officer as soon as possible and inform them of their actions concerning the item.

Items broken by the Enlisted Aide If property is damaged by an enlisted aide, the general officer should go to the installation claims office to seek the advice of a claims attorney. Take any evidence that is available such as pictures, statements, or receipts for the items damaged or destroyed. In lieu of receipts, the general officer should determine the value of the item, as that will be needed in order to begin a claim. The general officer must file a claim within two years of the loss, but should do so as soon as they become aware of the damage to best preserve the evidence and memories of witnesses. The claims attorney and paralegal will assist the general officer with filing the proper paperwork, but at a minimum the general officer needs a value to claim.

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In cases where the damage or loss was intentionally caused by the enlisted aide or was the result of the enlisted aide's willful negligence, the claims attorney may assist the general officer in filing a claim under Article 139 of the UCMJ. Unlike other types of claims, this claim is adjudicated by the enlisted aide's commander following an investigation. However, claims under this provision generally need to be filed within 90 days of the loss or damage. While this type of claim is not processed by the installation claims office, claims personnel will assist the general officer in guiding them through the process and communicating with the enlisted aide's chain of command.

IX. Physical Security and Crime Prevention

Physical security is defined as that part of security concerned with physical measures designed to safeguard personnel; to prevent unauthorized access to equipment, installations, material, and documents; and to safeguard against espionage, sabotage, damage, and theft. The enlisted aide is the first line of defense in the security of the general officer’s home. Once assigned as an enlisted aide for a general officer, it is important that they establish a solid working relationship with the installation Physical Security Manager and the Provost Marshall Office (PMO). Though not designated as an official security official the enlisted aide should be an active part of the security and crime prevention program. This chapter will cover the basics concerning security. It is not all inclusive and for further reading the enlisted aide is encouraged to refer to the Appendix section of this handbook for additional recommended references. A. Required Training All Department of Defense (DoD) affiliated personnel must receive an initial briefing and biennial Subversion and Espionage Directed against the US Army training. This training can be administered by the installation security office or taken online. For automation and online security training all Soldiers are required to complete the DoD Information Assurance program training course. This course should be taken annually.

B. Reviewing the Security Program Upon arriving at a new residence all enlisted aides should check with the former enlisted aide and general officer’s staff to receive a briefing on the current security environment. Any areas of special emphasis should be communicated to the enlisted aide and the general officer’s residence security program continuity book should be reviewed and received.

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NOTE: If the former enlisted aide does not provide you with a continuity book you should start your own. Once the new enlisted aide has been briefed they should then review, assess, and update the existing security procedures. There are a few main areas of concern that should receive the greatest attention when executing this process. Residence and area security. Information security – Documents and automated systems. Travel precautions. Important points of contact. Keep in mind that developing a sound security plan must involve an integrated approach as to who, what, when, where and how. This is why an enlisted aide must become familiar with the daily duties, personnel, and area that they will be working in and review the procedures that are in place. Ensure that the general officer, their family, and staff are aware of the residence emergency plan and know how to react to different threats. Ensure that the Provost Marshall Office and the installation Physical Security Manager have reviewed your current security plans and procedures. Their experience and input will prove to be helpful. C. Basic Security Procedures 1. Residence and area security. Survey the general officer’s residence and any other structures that are associated with the property. Identify all doors and windows of the property. Do they have proper locks? At the end of the duty day does the general officer wish you to secure any of the doors and windows? If the residence has a security system, familiarize yourself with its operation, capabilities, and limitations. Find out who is authorized to be in the residence on a regular basis (i.e., family members, friends). Does the residence have an established “safe” room? If it does, find out where it is and ensure that the general officer is also aware of this fact.

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What type of lighting does the residence have around it? When are the lights turned on, and is it your responsibility to perform this function on duty days? 2. Information Security. Much of the information that you will have direct contact with may not be officially classified as SECRET, but it should always be viewed as sensitive in nature and not to be released to anyone. If a person or entity requests even simple information regarding the general officers business not matter how innocent it may seem simply direct them to Protocol, the generals’ aide-de c-amp, or the installation public relations office. Ensure that all information is kept in a secure cabinet or safe. This includes guest rosters for special events and travel documents. When using computers, never leave your Common Access Card (CAC) in the keyboard. Always lock the system by removing your CAC card and place the card on your person. Do not open or even preview e-mails from personnel that you do not know. This can cause a virus to be released onto your system. Always shred documents when you no longer need them. Do not store passwords or other sensitive / classified documents and information on your computer at any time. Have the Automation Support Office (ASO) load a secure document shredder on your computer to ensure that documents that are deleted stay that way (remember this is for files ON your computer).

Inspect refuse (trash) before discarding for sensitive information. 3. Travel Precautions. The enlisted aide must be on the alert at all times for any potential security threat. Always be aware of your surroundings and those around you. Travelling with a general officer will increase the potential for a possible terrorist attack or adverse action against you and those with whom you travel. NOTE: The itinerary and other information pertaining to the travel of a person, which is often attached as an annex may, under certain conditions, be classified in accordance with AR 380-5. Hotel Safety Tips. (a) Stay at DoD facilities while on TDY, if possible.

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(b) Avoid staying in hotels with distinctively American names or predominantly western guests if possible. (c) Avoid taking street-level rooms, terrace-level rooms with direct access to hotel grounds, or stairwells. (d) Retain control over all luggage at all times upon arrival and departure. (e) When in a hotel, make note of all escape routes. (f) Vary your pattern when entering and leaving your hotel. (g) Do not discuss travel plans over hotel phones. (h) Use extra caution in hotel lobbies and other public places where bombs may be placed. (i) Avoid suspicious activity. (j) Bellboys and other strangers in hotel lobbies should not be asked directions for specific places you intend to go.

(k) Do not conduct official business or meet casual acquaintances in your hotel room and never divulge the location of your duties. (l) Keep your room neat and clean. Air Safety Tips.

In most cases you will travel in military aircraft, but when traveling alone follow the tips listed below.

(a) Do not discuss military affiliations with strangers. (b) Maintain your official passports and related documents, such as military ID, travel orders, leave papers and billeting receipts in your personal carryon luggage. (c) Travel in conservative civilian clothing and maintain a professional appearance at all times.

Vehicle Safety Tips.

(a) Vary the routes and the times that you frequently travel.

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(b) Use vehicles that have no special identifying license plates or stickers. (c) Do a complete walk-around inspection of the vehicle before beginning travel. (d) Lock doors, gas tanks, and storage areas at all times. (e) Vehicles should be parked in secured, well lighted areas. (f) Never pick up hitchhikers.

4. Points of Contact. Enlisted aides should always keep on their person a list of important phone numbers and locations that can be referenced in case of an emergency or potential threat. (a) Local Hospital (b) Installation hospital or health clinic (if available) (c) Provost Marshall Office (d) Installation Security Office (e) Aide-de-Camp (f) Fire Department (g) Criminal Investigative Division D. Personnel Access to Residence As an enlisted aide you will be in and around the general officer’s residence on a regular basis. Over time you will know who the regular visitors of the residence are, to include maintenance and delivery personnel. Effective communication with the general officer and their family members will keep you informed as to who will be visiting the residence on any given day. If you see a person in or around the residence that you do not know or is acting strangely, stop them, and ask for their reason to be in the area. In addition to being alert and aware at all times, follow the below listed suggestions: Ensure maintenance personnel and contractors have an appointment and are scheduled to be there.

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Check the person's identification ID and/or badge before granting access to the quarters.

Do not allow the person to wander around the quarters unescorted at any given time.

Supervise/escort the worker until the work is completed. When in doubt, notify the security officer and/or military police.

E. Receiving Mail

Remove mail and newspapers promptly from their inboxes, yard and porch.

Check address for correctness or suspect of tampering.

Check for suspicious markings such as no return address, misspelled words in the address, sealed with tape, strange odor, leaking fluid, etc. If a person receives a package or letter that is suspicious do the following: 1. Stop. Do not handle. 2. Isolate yourself and others in the residence from the package. 3. Do not attempt to open, smell, or taste the contents of the letter or package. 4. Activate the residence emergency plan and call the military police. 5. If the letter or package is in the residence, do not allow anyone but emergency personnel into the residence. NOTE: Reminder that the enlisted aide is the primary point of contact for the quarters. F. Threat Identifiers Surveillance type activities around the area of quarters may be an indicator that something is not right and should be reported immediately. If at any time an enlisted aide identifies suspicious activity in or around the residence they should immediately call the military police, notify the chain of command, and then wait for further instructions. Under no circ*mstances should they attempt to act against the perceived threat. Some of the more common threat identifiers are:

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Personnel sitting in a parked vehicle near the residence for a long period of time. Suspicious recording or monitoring of your daily activities at quarters using cameras, binoculars and note-taking. Using disguises to cover activities such as door to door salesman and solicitors. Elicitations of any kind (e.g., email attempts to obtain information regarding the facility, intrusive questions or phishing for information from strangers). Grounds keeping - Inspect the grounds for obvious signs of intrusion like disturbed mulch, trampled bushes and shrubs and footprints in flower beds. G. Security Alarms The enlisted aide should also become thoroughly familiar with the instructions and operating procedures of the quarter’s security alarms. For further assistance seek assistance from your Physical Security Manager on post. Most quarters will have a security alarm, secure telephone, safe/panic room and/or safe bolted to the ground. Security systems should be tested at least quarterly, NOTE: Secure Terminal Equipment (STE) is the U.S. Government's current (as of 2008) encrypted telephone communications system for wired or "landline" communications. The STE is the evolutionary successor to the STU-III. There is a PC Card slot in the STE that allows a Crypto Card to be inserted; when an NSA configured Crypto Card are present, secure calls can then be placed to other STE phones. The KSV-21 Enhanced Crypto Card is a US National Security Agency approved PC card that provides type 1 encryption functions and key storage to the STE secure telephones and other devices. The enlisted aide should contact the installation Security Manager for further assistance.

H. Security Containers A record of opening and closing of the safe will be maintained for each safe used for storing classified information. Security containers are usually serviceable for at least 25 years, if properly maintained. Periodical inspection should be performed to ensure serviceability.

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Utilize the SF 702, Security Container Check Sheet, to document when the safe is opened and closed. I. Operations Security (OPSEC) OPSEC is a process used to deny potential adversaries information about capabilities and/or intentions by identifying, controlling, and protecting unclassified information that gives evidence of the planning and execution of sensitive activities. OPSEC is everyone’s responsibility. Failure to properly implement OPSEC measures can result in serious injury or death to our personnel, damage to weapons systems, equipment and facilities, loss of sensitive technologies and mission failure. Annual training should be completed by all. OPSEC and social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter can provide adversaries, such as terrorists, spies and criminals, with critical information needed to harm you or disrupt your mission. Enlisted aides should complete required yearly OPSEC training in AKO. For further information and materials enlisted aides can also visit the following website www.ioss.gov. J. Handling a Telephone Threat You must be aware of types of threats that may come into quarters by telephone. Respond calmly and attempt to record all information concerning the individual that is calling. Check with local/post military police, crime prevention section, and the local security manager to ensure that you adhere to the correct procedures, or for more information regarding additional procedures available. Utilize the ATF F 1613.1, Bomb Threat Sheet, and keep a copy of this form under or near your telephones for use, if necessary.

K. Force Protection Conditions Force Protection Conditions (FPCONs) is a DOD-approved system that standardizes the Department of Defense’s identification and recommended preventive actions and responses to terrorist threats against U.S. personnel and facilities. This system is the principle means for a commander to apply an operational decision on how to protect against terrorism and facilitates inter-Service coordination and support for antiterrorism activities. All Soldiers should be familiar with the different levels of FPCONs. FPCON NORMAL applies when a general global threat of possible terrorist activity exists and warrants a routine security posture. FPCON ALPHA applies when there is an increased general threat of possible terrorist activity against personnel or facilities, the nature and extent are unpredictable.

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FPCON BRAVO applies when an increased or more predictable threat of terrorist activity exists. FPCON CHARLIE applies when an incident occurs or intelligence is received indicating some form of terrorist action or targeting against personnel or facilities is likely. FPCON DELTA applies in the immediate area where a terrorist attack has occurred or when intelligence has been received that terrorist action against a specific location or person is imminent. Normally, this FPCON is declared as a localized condition. The installation moves to a high state of alert, and commander implements mandatory security measures.

X. Entertaining A. Overview – Preparing food for a general officer can range from a simple breakfast for the officer to a large dinner party with dozens of guests. A general officer has a daily schedule that is usually filled with meetings, inspections, and decision making. The one time that they get to relax is usually during a meal with family, friends, or special guests. That makes the culinary duties of an enlisted aide that much more important. Their culinary expertise will be on display during the service of these meals and must always be of the highest quality for the diners that will be present. A well prepared meal should always be an enjoyable, positive part of an otherwise stressful day for a general officer. Of all the duties that an enlisted aide performs, their culinary creativity and attention to detail are probably the most important, due to the fact that a well thought out dining event can set a positive and enjoyable mood for all who attend. The menu served, atmosphere and service all fall on the organizational and culinary skills of the enlisted aide. With proper planning, a skilled enlisted aide can exercise his or her creativity when designing dishes for all to see and enjoy. B. Use of Official Representation Funds Official Representation Funds (ORF) events are normally hosted and attended by (not simply sponsored by) members of the Senior Executive Service (SES) or general officers. For official functions related to the enlisted aide duties, funds will originate from ORF. In most cases the protocol office will handle the release and use of these funds to the enlisted aide for all food and assorted supplies associated with meals for official functions. Listed below are a few excerpts related to the release and use of these funds from AR 37-47.

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ORF will be used to extend official courtesies to authorized guests of the United States, DOD, and the Department of the Army (DA). Official courtesies will be in keeping with propriety as dictated by the occasion and conducted on a modest basis to maintain the standing and prestige of the United States at home and abroad. Official courtesies and ORF-related expenses include: 1. Meals and refreshments, which include, but are not limited to: a. Receptions and participation expenses at DOD-sponsored events held in honor of authorized guests. b. Receptions hosted for local authorized guests at events required to maintain civic or community relations. c. Receptions at events that the Army is co-hosting to share expenses or non-Army hosted events to reciprocate the host. d. Receptions to enable newly assigned commanders or appropriate senior officials to meet local dignitaries and officials. 2. Disposable supplies related to meals, refreshments, and receptions, such as flatware, napkins, and perishable flower and candle arrangements. 3. An official courtesy of flowers when attending funerals for representational purposes. 4. Rental of appliances, tables, chairs, glasses, plates, tablecloths, tents, and other event support items directly related to providing official courtesies. The most cost-effective and efficient use of resources should be considered to determine rental, lease, or purchase. Hosts are encouraged to extend official courtesies within their quarters. Hosting events within quarters does not mitigate the requirement for costs to be modest, reflecting a level of hospitality that the typical American host, whose rank and position are equal to that of the guest, would provide to a special guest. Pre-approval may be required to utilize ORF to pay expenses for an alternate location such as post club, rental hall, etc. if the quarters are not sufficient. C. Protocol The Protocol Office is an important point of contact when it comes to many of the general officer’s official schedule and functions. They will provide official gifts when needed as well as all the normal printed items. They are also responsible for official gift management, and should be present whenever gifts are presented to the general officer. Usually one person from the protocol office is assigned a specific event and they will coordinate all aspects with you and the general officer. Some of the items provided by protocol are:

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Printing and table placement of name cards Seating charts Guest list Menu cards A list of any dietary restrictions or food allergies for the guests that will attend. NOTE: If protocol is not present when gifts are presented to the general officer, the enlisted aide can assist in accepting and cataloging gifts and then turn over any official gifts to protocol or the front office immediately. D. Official Events Definition – for the exact guidance and restrictions regarding the use of ORF funds please refer to AR 37-47, however, in most cases, the command Protocol office will determine whether or not the event can be classified as “Official” and use ORF to pay for it. 1. Funded by ORF. 2. Types of official entertaining: this may range from a simple breakfast to a private dinner. Remember that official events are always coordinated by the installation Protocol Office. 3. The general officer will always choose the menu. The enlisted aide will provide the general officer with menu options for them to review. The enlisted aide will provide the menu to Protocol at least a week in advance. The enlisted aide will always communicate with the general officer and understand their intent for the event and how you plan to fulfill their requirements. NOTE: The enlisted aide should attend weekly calendar meetings (staff meetings) if at all possible. This will ensure that the enlisted aide is informed of the general officer’s schedule and needs (uniform, meals, guests, travel) that may require his/her duties. These meetings are usually attended by, but not limited to the following: aid-de-camp, XO, chief of staff, executive assistants, and the enlisted aide. E. Un-official Events An un-official event is any social event, personal in nature, to the general officer that does not fall under the regulatory guidance stated in AR 37-47 (see above excerpts) that would authorize the use of ORF funding.

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1. Un-official events are funded with the general officer’s own personal funds. 2. Examples of un-official events: regular meals for the general officer and spouse, Hails and Farewells, holiday social occasion, and meals taken at the general officer’s office. NOTE: Un-official events are a good time for the enlisted aide to try out new recipes. 3. The enlisted aide should always speak with the general officer and understand their expectations for daily meals. The general officer will provide information to include meal times and menu selection to the enlisted aide. Remember that at this time the enlisted aide should always go over any diet restrictions or allergies with the general officer. 4. The enlisted aide then develops a variety of menus (see menu planning below) for the different meals and / or events that will occur on a regular basis. 5. The enlisted aide would then go over the menus with the general officer and finalize the menus. This should be done directly with the general officer (not the general officers chief of staff or aide-de-camp). 6. The enlisted aide should periodically update and/or recommend new items (changes) in the meals with the general officer. It is recommended that this be done quarterly. NOTE: The general officer’s spouse may wish to see the menus. Any suggestions that the spouse recommends should be passed on to the general officer. F. Types of Social Events This list is not all inclusive, but does give some examples of the more common civilian social events. NOTE: An event must be official in nature in order to require the enlisted aide to prepare food. NOTE: All times listed for the different types of events are generic in nature. The times in a live environment will always be set by the general officer. Tea. A tea is a "get together" given to meet a house guest or a special person. Often a special person is honored and the guests greet the individual in person or in a receiving line.

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1. Teas for a few or many guest usually start at 1600. They may also be held at a time designated by the host; any time between the hours of noon and 1600 may be appropriate (aka afternoon tea). 2. The tea table is always covered with a lace or an elaborate cloth. 3. The food served at a tea varies, but could consist of: tea, punch, dainty finger foods, sandwiches and small cakes, small rolls or biscuits filled with hot creamed chicken, small tarts, pastries, cake, nuts, and mints. Coffee. A coffee is an informal entertainment event that is typically held on a weekday. It provides an opportunity for the host to get acquainted informally.

1. A coffee is usually held between 1000 and 1130 and the menu is similar to breakfast.

2. Items typically found at a coffee consist of coffee, tea and punch,

pastries – sweet and savory, a variety of finger foods, fresh fruit platter, or a special dessert may be served. NOTE: A coffee above is not to be confused with a spouse’s coffee. Brunch. A brunch is similar to any formal luncheon or dinner.

1. A common time for a brunch to be served is usually between 1100 and 1300 and consists of a combination of breakfast and lunch.

2. Items typically found on a brunch menu consist of: ham, quiche, fruit

compote, muffins or scones, sweet rolls or pastries, fruit juice, coffee or tea. Luncheon. Most luncheons are official occasions frequently held in honor of a visiting dignitary at your base, post, or station. 1. Luncheons usually start between 1100 and 1300. 2. Formal luncheons have three or four courses. 3. Informal luncheons may only have two courses. 4. Menus are simple, such as: quiche with a salad, salads and sandwiches, fruit, or a special dessert may be served. Formal Dinner. The following are common procedures related to formal dining.

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1. Review formal place settings in an etiquette book, if necessary. 2. Designate dinner partners and tables by seating charts or escort cards (usually provided by Protocol). 3. Put place cards (usually provided by Protocol) on the tables. 4. Serve hors d’oeuvres between 1900 and 1930. 5. Serve dinner between 1930 and 2000.

NOTE: Serving times listed are the most common but the actual times for a formal dinner will be decided by the general officer. 6. Menus for formal dinners vary greatly and the following are examples and suggestions regarding formal dinners. a. A five-course dinner could be soup, fish, main course, salad, and dessert. b. A four-course dinner could be soup, main course, salad, and dessert. c. A three-course dinner could be soup, main course (with asparagus instead of salad), and dessert. NOTE: The most common number of courses for a formal dinner is four to five and is usually constrained by both the amount of time reserved for the dinner and the monetary cap per person. Very few formal dinners will have more than six total courses d. Serve rolls with the meal only if requested by the host/hostess. e. Serve coffee after dinner. f. Serve mints after the final course (optional). g. Serve liqueurs, but not at the dining table. Formal Dinner – Example of sequence of courses and course wine. 1. Shrimp co*cktail, oysters or clams on the half shell, or fruit cup -- White Burgundy. 2. Soup (usually clear) -- Sherry. 3. Fish, hot or cold -- White wine.

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4. Main course of meat and vegetables -- Claret. 5. Main course of game and vegetables -- Burgundy. 6. Salad -- No new wine. 7. Dessert -- Champagne. 8. Fresh fruit -- Champagne.

Buffet. A buffet meal is a favorite form of serving many guests in a small space with or without help. Guests serve themselves from a buffet table and eat at designated locations throughout the house. The host or hostess may choose to pass the foods again or ask the guests to return for seconds. Most often the aide-de-camp, executive officer, or specific friends assist. Any personnel that are assisting in the preparation or serving of a meal should be cleared through the Protocol office prior to the meal. 1. The time of the buffet varies depending on the desire of the host or hostess. 2. Buffet menus vary, but may include roast beef, turkey, or ham; salad and dessert; a main course of meat and vegetables, with or without salad and dessert; or a casserole, salad, and dessert. The meat dish, such as chicken ala king or any of the curries that are favored, can usually be prepared in advance. 3. Coffee is passed or served in the dining area. Reception. Formal and informal receptions are large parties held to honor individuals, couples, or groups. At formal receptions, such as the ones held by the commanding general, guests go through a receiving line. 1. Receptions are held at various hours, according to their nature, with less formal affairs frequently held from 1800 to 2000. 2. Foods served at receptions are as simple or as elaborate as the host desires and the occasion requires. 3. One room is usually set aside for food, but more rooms may be needed at large receptions. Office Call. For an enlisted aide, one of the more common duties that will require your attention will be preparing and serving guests for a general officer’s office call. As simple as the menu may seem, it must be remembered that the office call will be executed at the headquarters (in most cases) where there will

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be few preparation facilities other than a simple sink, refrigerator, coffee machine, and possibly a microwave. This means that most of the items needed for the office call need to be stored at the location if at all possible. The enlisted aide should have, at a minimum, the following items stored at the general officers headquarters/office: 1. A serving tray 2. Basic china set 3. Coffee maker 4. Cleaning supplies G. Planning Menus 1st step – The five Ws! Protocol normally answers the 5 Ws with the enlisted aide following up with any questions concerning the details of these important questions. 1. Who is attending (dignitaries or high ranking officials)? 2. What is the purpose of the event (official or non-official)? 3. When will the event happen (date and time)? 4. Where is the event going to be held (quarters, office, or another location)? 5. Why is the event occurring (visiting dignitary, VIP, head of state in order to determine formality of event, either formal or informal)? Once the enlisted aide has received the information regarding the 5Ws from the Protocol office, they can start to prepare the menu. 2nd Step – Find out if there will be any guests that have specific dietary restrictions or food allergies. Plan the menu accordingly if this is the case. Again, Protocol will be able to supply the enlisted aide with the answers to this question. 3rd Step – Determine whether the kitchen and dining area will be able to support the event. 4th Step – Estimate the number of staff needed to prepare and serve the meal for the event. If additional staff is required to prepare the meal for the

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event, the enlisted aide should notify the Protocol office and have them make the arrangements for the additional personnel. 5th Step – Develop a menu(s) and then pass it on to the general officer for approval / disapproval. Once approved, the menu will be passed on to the Protocol office so that it may be reviewed and passed on to the guests if they wish. 6th Step – Protocol controls the funding for official events. Once the menu is approved, the enlisted aide coordinates with the Protocol office to purchase the necessary items for the event. The cardholder may be someone in the Protocol office or someone else within the command (i.e., budgeting office). H. Helpful Hints Regarding Menus Mise en place (pronounced meez en plas)...”Putting in place” If basic cooking principles are the heart of food service, and food safety and sanitation is the backbone, and then mise en place would be the brain. Even on the simplest level of culinary arts, pre-planning and early preparation is a must in food service. When instructed to create a menu for a formal occasion the enlisted aide should consider the following factors: 1. How many entrees are requested? If you do not know the answer to this question, inquire to the general officer and /or their spouse prior to constructing the sample menus. 2. Is there a theme to follow? If the answer is yes, then ensure that the menu items complement each other and follow the theme. 3. Select recipes from reliable sources. 4. Compare recipes with similar recipes from different sources to ensure that the best possible recipe is used. 5. Determine availability of ingredients. 6. Determine if the recipe can be prepared with existing kitchen facilities. This question should already be answered but check this again as the menus are being developed and finalized. 7. Convert the recipes to the amount of portions that will best be suited to the operation or occasion. 8. If the general officer or their spouse has added a recipe that you are not familiar with, test it prior to the event.

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9. Evaluate the prepared food item for desired quality and appearance to determine whether the item can be prepared and served within constraints. NOTE: At a minimum you should provide 3 different menu options for the general officer and spouse from which to choose. In addition to the 5 Ws the following is a list of questions that you will want to keep in mind while preparing the menu: NOTE: Be prepared to create menu cards (Protocol should supply you with them, but on occasion the enlisted aide may have to create and print these themselves). Additional Considerations for the Meal 1. The time of year/season (this would affect the decorating and possible the meal choices). 2. Dinnerware to include glassware and cutlery. 3. Special fine china requests or family dinnerware. 4. Type of napkin fold. 5. Table decorations (centerpiece and candles). 6. Drinks that will be served such as water, wine, or sweet tea and coffee. 7. Takeaways such as chocolates or truffles (this may vary according to the occasion or type of function). 8. Ice sculpture or beverage fountain.

I. Table Service Never forget ... You are not "just" setting the table ... You are also setting the mood! NOTE: An excellent reference that goes into far greater detail regarding general table service may be viewed at http://media.frontsummit.com/Materials/SAMPLE_Fine_Dining_Handbook.pdf Basic Table Setting Rules For formal dining events you don't need a lot of decoration because the table setting is the center of attention. A few tastefully placed candles, name holders that match your theme/occasion, and some fresh flowers can add the finishing touches to an important occasion. These are many items that can be added to your table, but don't get overly cluttered, more is not necessarily better.

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As a general rule, formal occasions often call for more "white space" than other types of dinner parties. Other items that the enlisted aide can add to the dinner setting are things like lighting (candles and soft lighting is almost always better) and good dinner party music. For music always check with the general officer and, if they are to be present, the general officer’s spouse. The following is a list a simple reminder’s to the enlisted aide to ensure a great atmosphere is created for a successful dining occasion: 1. Always coordinate with the general officer and spouse before setting up the table. 2. It is highly recommended that you set up the table 24 hours before the event. 3. You should inspect and clean all chairs, linen and other materials needed for the event no less than 72 hours before the event. 4. Everything on the table should be balanced and uniformly arranged. 5. The white card above the placemat is a place card, which tells who sits where. 6. Many times the cutlery follows the shape of the table. 7. Every place setting should be exactly the same, to the millimeter. An inexperienced enlisted aide may use some measuring device to assist them when completing this step.

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Tablecloth When choosing a tablecloth, bigger isn't necessarily better: Look for a 10 to 12 inch drop for casual settings and 15-18 inches for formal dining. To check the draping, place a napkin or the corner of the tablecloth over your hand; the fabric should fall into even curves instead of hanging limply. 1. Pull the chairs away so you can freely walk around the table. 2. Lay the silence pad down and cover with the tablecloth. Make sure that all the sides are hanging true. 3. Tablecloths should not overhang from the table by more than 18” or by less than 12.” 4. Align the needed chairs so they are spaced evenly down the side of the table. Now sight the chairs that are across the table from each other. NOTE: For some formal occasions no tablecloth will be used, only placemats. Covering up a beautiful antique table for instance would be a shame. So, if possible, use only placemats. Ensure that the general officer is informed of this option if it may be used. Placemats 1. Use last step from above. 2. Center the placemat on its chair. 3. The edge of the placemat should be 1/2 inch from the table's edge. If you have the large placemats the flatware goes on the placemat. If you have the small English type the flatware goes on the table.

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NOTE: Placemats can now be used instead of tablecloths when setting the table for an official/non-official event.

Flatware Placement Rules 1. Always place flatware in the order in which it is going to be used, starting from the outside and working in towards the plate. Flatware is never laid on the table according to size. 2. Flatware should be placed 1” from the edge of the table. 3. Because the majority of people are right-handed, the knife and spoon are laid on the right side of the place setting and the fork on the left. The left-handed diner reverses the placement. 4. If there are an uneven number of people to be seated, the odd numbered place settings are laid opposite the middle of the even numbered place settings. 5. Forks are placed to the left of the plate, with the exception of the seafood fork, which is to the right of the spoon, tines up. 6. Knives and spoons are to the right of the plate, with the blade of the knife facing in towards the plate. 7. Bread and butter plate will be 1” above the forks. 8. The individual butter knife is laid across the top of the butter plate, parallel with the edge of the table. 9. The handle of the knife is at the right, the blade facing towards the edge of the table. 10. The knife may be placed on the right side of the plate, parallel to the other utinsels. 11. Menu cards can be placed to left of forks or on the charger.

NOTE: To eliminate fingerprints on the handle, hold flatware by the "waist," the area between the handle and the eating end of the utensil. Table Decorations and Centerpieces Formal centerpieces for a formal dinner table can add color and elegance to any formal table setting. Look for centerpiece ideas that are low enough to hold a conversation over and that won't potentially bother your guests.

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Flowers are an old stand-by, but there are other ideas to consider as well. Consider the following when choosing a centerpiece for a formal dinner: 1. Candles 2. Sculpture 3. Seasonal item (Thanksgiving – cornucopia) 4. Hurricane lamp 5. Fruit Basket Final Steps 1. Pull the chairs away so you can freely walk around the table. 2. Roll the runner down the table and make sure that the ends hang even. The edge of the runner should be 1/2 inch from the table's edge. 3. Align the chairs so they are spaced evenly down the side of table. Now sight the chairs that are across the table from each other. 4. Place a cover plate in front of a chair. The edge of the plate should be 1” from the edge of the table. 5. Plate or charger should be placed 1” from the edge of the table along with the silverware and napkin. 6. At informal meals, dessert spoons and or forks may be placed on the table above the charger. 7. Salt and pepper shakers are usually placed above the dessert spoon and knife. 8. Napkin folds. An excellent reference for napkin folding may be found at http://bumblebeelinens.com/napkinFolding.php, however there are many books and web references that may be used to assist the enlisted aide in sharpening their skills when it comes to napkin folding. J. Plate Presentation The skills required for proper plate presentation are extensive and require a great deal of experience and skill. All enlisted aides will have attended the Advanced Culinary Skills Course as well as the Enlisted Aide Training Course; both located at Fort Lee, Virginia. These two courses provide a solid culinary

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foundation for the enlisted aide to draw upon when preparing meals. It should be noted that the enlisted aide should always be independently researching and refining their culinary skills. Always consider the following main elements when presenting food for any meal to be served: S – Shape. Different shapes bring variety, interest, and appeal to the plate. C – Color. Color of the components must be natural colors to that specific item and also provide a balance of different colors, not all one color. H – Height. Height brings eye appeal and dimension to the entrée. I – Items. Items or components should balance and complement each other. Plates should have the following: a. Main course or protein b. Vegetables c. A starch d. A crunch e. A sauce F – Flavors. Flavors should be different but balanced such as sweet and sour, mild and intense, soft and tough or cool and spicy. F – Flow. Items on the plate should flow in harmony and show uniformity as well as the lines on a dessert plate. F – Focal Point. Focal point is the area on the plate which the eye is automatically drawn to for example, the middle of the plate. T – Texture. Texture, the components on a dish should vary in texture or a crunch. A contrast in texture helps develop a better pallet feel. For example, bread sticks, croutons, toasted pecans or bread crumbs. NOTE: Reference: Working the Plate: The Art of Food Presentation Food Presentation Secrets: Styling Techniques of Professionals K. Basic Rules and Recommendations for Meal Service An enlisted aide must remember that there are different types and techniques of table service. In most cases the traditional American style service will be employed unless otherwise stated by the general officer. Enlisted aides

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will always consult with the general officer to see if there are any changes in table service or service preferences. Serving 1. Plates should be served all at once. The courses should be served simultaneously too, to allow all of the guests to start their meal at the same time.

2. Serve from the left. 3. Never reach in front of the guest.

4. The guest to the right of the host is traditionally served first and then continues counterclockwise from there. 5. The host and hostess should be served last. 6. Serve entrees from the left and remove from the right. 7. Beverages will be served from the right side. 8. The server can adjust serving entrees to the right if he or she feels that conversations between guests will be disturbed. 9. Traditionally wines are served at the meal with the courses they accompany. 10. One wine (red or white) is customary for informal meals, but two or more (red and white) may be offered for formal meals. 11. When pouring wine, the server stands to the right of each guest at the table and pours until the wine glass is one-third to one-half full. NOTE: An old custom is to pour a small amount, about ¼ glass of wine first into the host’s glass, so he/she can determine the quality and clearness of the wine. The enlisted aide may suggest this custom to the general officer to see if they wish to perform this custom during a social occasion. 12. Wine glasses may remain on the table through the meal along with the water glass. 13. Ensure that the glasses are filled whenever empty. Serving with More Than One Server 1. Plan strategy in advance so service will run smoothly.

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2. When using more than one server, one server starts meal service with the person to the right of the host and the other server starts with the person to the right of the hostess. 3. When using two or more waiters as a team, practice “mirror service.” 4. For eight or more guests - First server will serve the woman at the right of the host; second server will start with the guest of honor employing “mirror service.” Continue to serve counterclockwise around the table serving the host last. Removing Place Settings (glasses, plates, silverware etc.) 1. There are many methods for clearing, but the preferred method is for the server to remove the place settings from the table, two diners at a time, until the table is cleared and then begin serving, carrying two plates at one time. 2. Table service may be removed from the left, but glasses should be removed from the right to avoid reaching across or in front of the guests.

NOTE: Use of a Base Plate – The enlisted aide should discuss this with the host and hostess prior to an event to establish a standard for the house. Normally the place setting should not be left empty while the rest of the table is being cleared unless it is the dessert course, so the base plate remains through the main course. Then the entire table is cleared to include salt and pepper shakers. 3. Remove plates after each course, when all guests have finished eating and with approval of the host or hostess. Cleaning and Restoring the Kitchen and Serving Areas After the services are complete and the guests are finished, the area must be cleaned and inspected by the enlisted aide prior to departure. 1. Remove all tableware to the appropriate area for washing, drying, and storing. 2. Remove linens and napkins to the appropriate location to be laundered and stored (never store dirty linens – even temporarily). 3. Store leftover foods in proper containers in appropriate storage areas. Always use proper guidelines established by the Tri-Service Food Code for the saving, storage, and use of leftovers. 4. Wash, dry, and store tableware, serving dishes, pots, pans, and other equipment.

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5. Ensure that kitchen, dining, and serving areas are restored to a clean and orderly manner. 6. Reposition furniture to its original location. 7. Check for any damage to furniture, china, glasses, or linens and report such findings the next duty day to the general officer. Special Note - Foreign Dignitaries Whenever the guest list includes foreign dignitaries please check carefully with the local Protocol office to see if there are any unique customs that need to be addressed during the event. If specific customs are identified, check with the general officer to see if they wish to incorporate them into the event. This could include serving techniques, the menu, alcohol, and seating arrangements. The following are some examples of customs that are observed in foreign countries: 1. Serve all women before serving the men. 2. Continue serving clockwise, ending with the hostess. 3. Men and women will leave the table together to go into the living room for demitasse, liqueurs, and mints. L. Basic Bartending For the purpose of official entertainment, it may be necessary to stock and set up a wet bar. If this is requested by the general officer then the enlisted aide will always review the current inventory of the bar and determine if any alcohol purchases will be necessary.

Enlisted aides should remember that it is not necessary to buy all of the below listed items. The list is merely suggestions for a well stocked and equipped home bar. Always consult with the general officer when it comes to stocking the home bar. The needs will vary based on the guests and frequency of the special entertaining occasions. NOTE: It is always prudent for the enlisted aide to have an official running inventory of all alcohol items and to keep track of these items. Alcohol can be procured through use of .0012-Miscellaneous Expenses ORF funds. The following checklists are useful in determining specific bar needs.

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Essential Bar Equipment The checklist below is only a guide; items may be added or deleted to suite your needs. co*cktail shaker with top Lemon-lime squeezer Bottle opener Stainless-steel knife Corkscrew Ice bucket Set of ice tongs Long-handled mixing spoon Hawthorne strainer Bar spoon Julep strainer Cutting board Large mixing pitcher Coasters Jigger (1 ½ ounces) Stirrers Muddler (stir sticks) Napkins Boston shaker Speed pourer, or bottle pourer Electric blender Electric juicer Bottle opener Can opener Spirits

The enlisted aide may check with the Protocol office to see if invited guests have any special preferences. The following is a list of the basic spirits, liqueurs, and mixers to buy: Liquor 1. Whiskey, Rye or Canadian such as Crown Royal. 2. Scotch, single malt or blended such as Glenfiddich or Chivas Regal. 3. Bourbon, such as Makers Mark or Jack Daniels. 4. Rum, light or dark such as Bacardi Superior or Myers Dark Rum. 5. Gin has many nuances, try Tangueray, Bombay Sapphire or Beefeaters. 6. Vodka, a standard, try Smirnoff, Stolichnaya, Skyy or Absolute. 7. Tequila (ensure it is 100% Blue Agave).

Wines 1. Two (2) red wines. 2. Two (2) white wines.

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3. One (1) Sparkling wine (Champagne). Serving and storing suggestions for wine: a. Red wine should be stored at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, and should be served at room temperature. b. White and Blush wine should be served chilled. c. Champagne should be chilled quickly in an ice bath 30 minutes before service. After Dinner Liquors 1. Cognac such as Courvoisier or Remy Martin (only use VSOP). 2. Cordials such as Grand Marnier, B&B (Bourbon & Benedictine) and Drambuie. 3. Kahlua, Bailey’s Irish Cream, Crème de Menthe, and Frangelico.

Beer Beer should be placed in an ice chest and iced down at least 4 hours prior to the start of the function. A selection of Light and Full Bodied Brews should be considered. Non-Alcoholic Beverages

Non-alcoholic beverages consist of: 1. Sodas- co*ke, Diet co*ke, Sprite, etc. 2. Juices- Orange, grapefruit, cranberry, pineapple, and tomato. 3. Club soda. 4. Tonic water. 5. Sparkling mineral water. Garnishes for Drinks Garnishes are vital to flavor and eye appeal of the drink. Generally the kinds of garnishes used are lemon and lime wedges, co*cktail onions and olives for martinis, and cherries.

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Glasses Since every drink requires a special glass, there are a variety of glasses used. A minimum of eight glasses by type should be stocked. The glasses should be of a style that match the host's taste or is in keeping with the bar theme or surroundings. Highball Glass (aka Collins glass or Slim Jim) Typical volume of 350 to 400 ml / 12.3 to 14.1 Oz. Typical uses: Bloody Mary, Harvey Wallbanger

Lowball Glass (short version of the highball) Typical volume: 250 to 300 ml / 8.8 to 10.6 Oz. Typical uses: drinks with a high proportion of mixer to alcohol. Often, co*cktails with whiskey as the base ingredient are served in lowball. Wine Glass Typical volume: 250 to 300 ml / 8.8 to 10.6 Oz. Typical uses: wine, any co*cktail co*cktail Glass

Typical volume: 250 ml / 8.8 Oz. Typical uses: many co*cktails are served in co*cktail glasses. Daiquiris are usually served in co*cktail glasses. Some call this a "Margarita glass." Champagne Flute A slim elegant glass. Typical volume: 200 ml / 7.0 Oz. Typical uses: anything with champagne and bubbles. The tall shape of the glass helps prevent the drink going flat too fast. It also let bubbles rise slower, giving the best visual effect of the bubbles. Martini Glass (aka martini saucer) Classic and well-know shaped glass. Typical volume: 250ml / 8.8 Oz. Typical uses: Martini, of course. Also used for margaritas. Any drink looks good in it. A slight drawback is its small volume content which makes it less suitable for large co*cktails with many ingredients. It's very easy to spill your co*cktail due

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to the glass' shape, so be careful - this is not the type of glass you want to take onto the dance floor. Some call this a "co*cktail glass."

Shot Glass Typical volume: 25 ml or 50 ml / 0.9 to 1.8 Oz. Typical uses: shooters, designed to be hit back and swallowed in a single gulp. Champagne Saucer Typical volume: 300ml / 10.6 Oz. Typical uses: not many. It can be used to make smaller versions of “big” co*cktails. Often seen at weddings, this is not a widely used glass for co*cktails. In fact, it is totally unsuitable for champagne and drinks with bubbles as it shape results in the bubbles dissipating quickly and the drink going flat. Brandy Snifter (or goblet or balloon) Typical volume: 350 ml / 12.3 Oz. Typical uses: to sip good quality brandy and cognac. The brandy is poured to the widest part of the glass. The large surface area allows the aroma of the contents to rise and be concentrated at the narrow mouth for maximum effect.

Port and Sherry Glasses Typical volume: 200ml / 7.0 Oz. Typical uses: These smaller versions of wine glasses are usually used for drinking fortified wine.

Beer Glasses and Mugs Typical volume: 400 ml up to 2000 ml / 14.1 up to 70.4 Oz. (and even bigger in Germany). Typical uses: Beer Stein Glass Typical volume: 300 ml / 10 Oz. Typical uses: For drinking beer and ales. It usually looks very similar to a normal beer mug.

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Hurricane Glass Typical volume: 300 ml / 10 Oz. Typical uses: Often used to serve tropical co*cktails in, but it really can be used for any long drink as an alternative to a high ball. Maintenance and Service Items You should have the following items when maintaining your bar and serving your guests: 1. Bar towels. 2. Trash cans. 3. Trash bags. Organizing the Bar The trick to running a smooth bar operation is the placement of the items being used. The table below lists the items and placement for a smooth operation. The location of the bar must be taken into consideration; it should be accessible to the guests but away from the food table. It should not be so large for the room that it dominates the area. Item Placement Bar Centered but out of the congested area Tables Directly behind the bar, but leave enough walking space Glasses Wine glasses – On the top shelf inside the bar

Highball – On the second shelf inside the bar Rock glasses – Next to the highball glasses inside the

bar Pilsners – On the third shelf, inside the bar Liquors Place on top of the bar, to the left or right

Wine Decant into carafes, on top of the bar opposite the liquors Beer Place in ice chest with ice, set on table behind the bar Sodas Place on table behind the bar and place one can of each soda on the top of the bar to allow guest to see the selection Juices Place one of each on top of the bar, and then place the extra supplies on the table behind the bar Garnishes Place on top the bar next to the liquors Service Items Place on top the bar, in an area where they are accessible Trash cans Place on both sides of the bar, with a tablecloth wrapped around it Scoop Place with ice

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Recipe Book Always have a book with a detailed list of common drinks that your guests may wish to have during the evening. A basic bartenders guide will suffice for most events. Event Checklist The below event checklist is an effective tool to assist the enlisted aide in planning any event requested by the officer. Recommend using this checklist in the initial meeting for any event.

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XI. Purchasing and Accountability A. Overview An important responsibility for the enlisted aide is financial accountability and keeping a clear audit trail for all expenses related to their daily duties. Whether the funding comes from Official Representation Funds or the general officer’s own private funds, the enlisted aide is required to keep detailed records to ensure that the funds are used in a legal and efficient manner. While there are no official forms that the enlisted aide is required to use for tracking purchases it is highly recommended that a common sense ledger and filing system be used for accounting of all expenditures and tracking of purchased items. Many traditional Army dining facility forms may be used to track purchases and inventory. The following is a list of forms that may prove to be useful to an enlisted aide when creating an audit trail for financial and subsistence accountability: 1. DA Form 3234 Inventory Record 2. DA Form 3234-1 Monthly Inventory Recap Sheet 3. DA Form 3546 Control Record for Dining Facility (this may be used for the petty cash fund in addition to the financial ledger). NOTE: Many of the digitized versions of these forms may be found at the following web address: http://www.quartermaster.army.mil/jccoe/publications/food_links.html B. Types of Funds Purchasing funds used by the enlisted aide will fall into two (2) general categories: 1. Official Representational Funds (ORF). Used for officially sanctioned events and usually received from the Protocol office to the enlisted aide. 2. The general officers’ personal funds used for non-official events. For ORF funding, the items procured will be identified and strictly controlled. The enlisted aide will buy only those items required to fulfill the needs of the event. For private items used for the general officer’s daily needs regardless of purpose, the enlisted aide will ensure that the expenditures will be in compliance with the guidance given to them by the general officer.

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C. Payment of Items The enlisted aide will need to establish the method of payment used when purchasing items for an event. When using ORF funds the government credit card will be used in most cases. The list below represents the most common payment methods used by enlisted aides in the execution of their duties. 1. Cash. Commonly used for purchasing private needs of the general officer. 2. Blank check (personal, authorized). 3. Pre-signed check (by general or his designee). 4. Credit Card (personal, authorized) – Common for most official functions utilizing ORF funds. D. Delegation of Authority To cash personal checks or use the general officer’s personal credit card, it may be useful to have the DA Form 1687 Notice of Delegation of Authority, already on file with the organizations with which you intend on doing business (Commissary, Post Exchange). Additionally, it is highly recommended that the delegation of authority be used for the following situations: 1. Cashing personal checks. 2. Depositing funds into personal/business account. 3. Use of his/her credit card. 4. Issue a debit card. E. Helpful Hints When Making Purchases 1. Plan your spending. Always take an accurate inventory prior to shopping and review upcoming events, both official and un-official. 2. Advertised items are not necessarily the cheapest. 3. Watch for unadvertised specials. 4. Remember to ask for a "rain check" if an item is sold out. 5. An enlisted aide’s time is limited so try to avoid crowds, do not shop after work, on paydays, or just before holidays.

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6. Buy items before you run out of them. Buy at clearance, or sale price, instead of regular price when you must have the item. 7. Know the sales cycles in your area. 8. Just because an item is on sale, doesn't necessarily mean that you should buy it. If you won't use it, don't buy it. 9. Due to volume discounts, larger stores are generally cheaper than smaller ones. 10. Stock up on commonly used items when prices are low (always check with the general officer if this may be done). F. Tracking Purchases The tracking of expenses should be separated into two groups: Private and ORF funding. Keep separate ledgers for these purchases. Ledgers should be done for each calendar month and further separated by subsistence and non-subsistence items. For accounting purposes, it is best to group these deposits and expenditures by month and year. Reconciliation of the ledgers must be performed with the general or their spouse as frequently as deemed necessary. For the use of ORF funds, enlisted aides must maintain records and receipts of expenditures for official events or functions, related to the general officer's official duties. Enlisted aides should record entries accurately in a ledger and annotate required forms to show proper use of funds. Spending funds from an official account must be approved by your local Protocol office and reconciled by their designee immediately following (or at least by the next day) any event using those funds. Receipts accompany the Official Entertainment Balance Sheet if official liquor inventories are used, then a liquor inventory control sheet must be turned in with Official Entertainment Balance Sheet. NOTE: Sample ledgers and purchase spreadsheets may be found on the JCCoE Enlisted Aide website: http://www.quartermaster.army.mil/jccoe/Special_Programs_Directorate/Enlisted_Aide_web_documents/enlisted_aide_main.html

NOTE: The website will be updated periodically with new tools for enlisted aides that may be downloaded directly from the site. All enlisted aides are encouraged to submit any useful tools they have created or acquired to the Senior Enlisted Aide Advisor located at Fort Lee.

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A monthly household cost report can simplify this process and may be posted in an easily accessible location, such as on the side of the refrigerator so that the general officer and their spouse may review it whenever needed. G. Purchase Orders (PO) For all purchases, a PO form (there are several types of credit card PO forms available online) should be used and attached to the receipt. These PO forms should be grouped by month and year and saved for a minimum of six (6) years for audit purposes. Two copies of each PO should be kept: one original (for the general officer and/or Billing Official) and one for the enlisted aides own personal records. Each accounting month should have a completed end of month report that includes the following: 1. All purchase orders with receipts attached in order of date of purchase. 2. Detailed ledger(s). Example – one for subsistence, one for alcohol, and one for miscellaneous items. 3. A detailed end of month inventory for all subsistence and alcoholic items. NOTE: Remember that two End of Month (EOM) reports should be created and saved, one for the enlisted aide and one for the general officer/Billing Official. H. Receipts The enlisted aide should keep all original receipts plus an additional copy of all receipts for accounting purposes. Organize the store receipts, commissary, and itemized purchase lists. NOTE: Try to make electronic copies of all documentation if possible. These documents can then be saved to a compact disc for quick reference and as an emergency backup if original documentation if lost or damaged. I. Reimbursem*nts for Personal Duty Expenditures If applicable, the enlisted aide may want to establish an account whereby they may be reimbursed for the mileage they accumulate while driving their POV in the performance of their official duties. The SF 1164, Claim for Reimbursem*nt for Expenditures on Official Business, is the form they will need for this procedure. J. Petty Cash Fund The general officer and spouse will establish the amount of cash to be maintained in the quarter's petty cash fund. These monies are for family personal needs that include laundry, dry cleaning, and related personal

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household items. Keep all petty cash funds in a secure lock box in a designated location. Balance petty cash funds regularly to verify accountability. When requested by the general or spouse to make specified purchases from petty cash, make a note of the instructions given and fill out the proper forms for a petty cash transaction. Record essential information in a ledger or fill out required forms. That includes the following information: 1. Date of transaction. 2. Locations of purchases. 3. A detailed record of what items were purchased (you may use a standard Purchase Order form if you wish). 4. A ledger that records all transactions, by month, with a running balance that reflects all transactions. 5. Maintain purchase receipts in designated file or ledger for all petty cash transactions. 6. Place change from the purchase in the lock box with the remaining petty cash and secure it. 7. On a regular basis, count the cash in the lock box to ensure the ledger balance and the lock box monies are equal. 8. The enlisted aide should update the general or their spouse on the status of the petty cash fund on a regular basis (at least once per month). 9. Replenish petty cash fund upon instructions from the general officer or spouse. K. Storage and Inventory of Subsistence and Beverages Overview The enlisted aide should maintain an accurate inventory of all subsistence and beverages that are purchased for the general officer. This includes all ORF purchases as well as private purchases made with the general officer’s personal funds.

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When maintaining an inventory, the enlisted aide should approach this in a similar manner that is used in Army dining facilities. The only real difference is that it is for a much smaller subsisting group and the money originates from the general officer or the ORF funds. It is strongly recommended that separate inventories be kept for the different purchasing funds as well for regular subsistence and alcohol purchases. a. Inventory #1 – Subsistence from general officer private funds b. Inventory #2– Alcohol from general officer private funds c. Inventory #3 – Subsistence from ORF funds d. Inventory #4 – Alcohol from ORF funds Maintain the inventories just as it is done in a standard dining facility. It must be noted that the enlisted aide may use or create their own inventory forms and use them in the execution of their duties. The end result must be a clear audit trail and 100% accountability of all items purchased and used during the execution of their duties.

Quantity

ORF Personal Refer Freezer Cabinet lbs/ea/servings

Example- Ground Beef x 10 LBS 2-Feb-14 25-Jan-14

Example- Mini Quiche x 30 ea 1-Jun-14 25-May-14

Inventory Date: DD / MM / YYYY Name: Last, First, RANK

Funding Type

Food and Beverage Inventory List

LocationProduct Name Date Purchased Used for Event Date

NOTE: The inventories should match up with the financial ledgers. L. Storing Subsistence Enlisted aides should refer to the Tri-Service Food Code when receiving, storing, and preparing subsistence. The following are some of the minimum requirements for storing subsistence. Semi-Perishable Items 1. Always keep your storage a minimum of 6 inches off of the floor whether on shelves, dunnage racks, or any other storage component. 2. Use First In – First Out to ensure proper rotation practices.

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3. Store foods in areas that are optimum for their shelf life and quality. You can usually find this information on the manufacturer’s web site. For example, do not store bread in the cooler. Bread should be stored in dry storage or frozen until needed. Storing bread in the cooler will turn it stale faster, reducing its quality and shelf life. 4. Try to organize your storage areas in a way that is easy to understand and follow. For example, keep dairy products with other dairy products, produce with other produce, and spices with other spices. 5. Ensure that storage area is clean. Wipe dust and food spillage from the shelves on a daily basis or as needed. 6. Check availability of storage space prior to making large purchases for special events. If the required storage space is not available then notify the general officer after solutions have been researched (try to go to the general officer with solutions, not just problems). 7. Clearly date all new stock before storing it. 8. Do not store cases or large bags of subsistence on the floor. Ensure they are stored a minimum of 6 inches above the floor level. 9. Place the opened bags of flour or sugar, in their original containers, into stainless steel or plastic containers as required. Perishable Items Always store perishable items within the Temperature Danger Zone. This is the temperature range where bacteria can grow and reproduce rapidly (between 40 and 140 degrees F, or between 5 and 60 degrees C). Potentially hazardous foods should be kept at temperatures below 40o F or above 140o F. Perishable Subsistence Temperature Range: Meats and poultry 34º - 38º F Fish and shellfish 33º - 38º F Dairy products 34º - 38º F Fruits and vegetables 36º - 39º F Frozen foods 10º - 0º F

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Routinely check the refrigerator and freezer cabinet temperatures. Keep refrigerator and freezer temperature log to record temperatures, if necessary. 1. Ensure the air temperature of the refrigerators is 32º to 38º. 2. Ensure the air temperature of the freezer is 0º F or below. 3. Report refrigerator and freezer temperatures that are not within these limits to proper authorities and notify the general officer if a major appliance needs to be replaced. NOTE: Clean the freezer and refrigerator on a weekly basis or as needed. 4. Avoid odor-imparting and odor-absorbing foods within the same refrigerator. Place in separate refrigerators if available. 5. Space or stack items to allow air to circulate around them. 6. Check the refrigerators and freezers periodically to ensure the proper temperatures are maintained after cleaning and restocking. Beverages (to include alcohol) 1. Wine bottles must be stored on their sides. 2. White wine should not be exposed to sunlight.

Storage temperatures for beverages must be maintained as follows: Beverage Temperature Range Spirits 60º - 68º F Beer 38º - 45º F Red wine 55º - 60º F White & Rose wine 40º - 45º F M. Inspection of Food and Beverages Overview When purchasing goods for the general officer and his family you are entrusted with their funds to provide items of the highest quality. You need to be prepared to select items, detect leaks, holes, cracks, and swelling in canned goods; grease, moisture, discoloration, and insect or rodent activity in dry storage items; offensive odors or the slimy condition of meat, fish, and poultry; molded or rotten fruits and vegetables; firmness or excess ice build up on frozen items to determine if thawing has occurred; and expiration dates on dairy products must be checked.

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Inspection of Perishables Perishables consist of meats, fruits, vegetables, poultry, seafood, milk, butter, and cheese, eggs (fresh, frozen, or cured meats, and fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables). Check perishable items for signs of spoiling prior to purchasing or preparing them. 1. Check meat, poultry, and fish to make sure they do not have an offensive odor. 2. Check fresh fruits and vegetables to make sure there is no mold or rot. 3. Inspect frozen foods for signs of thawing and refreezing. 4. Press the package with your fingers to ensure that item is firm. 5. Make sure that the package is not hard on one side and soft on the other. 6. Check frozen meat products to make sure that there is no frozen blood in the containers. 7. Check the expiration date on dairy products to ensure it has not expired. 8. Look for signs of insect or rodent infestation. Inspection of Semi-Perishables Generally, semi-perishables require no refrigeration and are shelf stable, except under extreme temperatures, due to the presence of preservatives, specialized processing or packaging. Semi-perishables consist of dried fruits and vegetables, canned goods, and packaged goods such as sugar, flour, or pasta products. Check the following when purchasing containers or packages of dry storage items: 1. Exposure to greasy substances. 2. Exposure to moisture. 3. Evidence of insect or rodent activity. 4. Inspect canned goods for leaks, holes, cracks, rust, or swelling. 5. Check the expiration dates on items.

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N. Subsistence Disposal Garbage and refuse must be kept in durable fly and rodent proof containers. Lids shall cover containers at all times. Containers used indoors shall be periodically cleaned. Outside containers shall be stored on or above a smooth surface or nonabsorbent material that is kept clean, graded to prevent accumulation of liquid waste, and maintained in good repair.

XII. Care and Maintenance of General Officers Uniforms

One of the most important tasks performed as an enlisted aide is the care and maintenance of the general officer’s uniforms. This section will cover the regulations and areas of responsibility pertaining to the general officer’s uniforms. An enlisted aide should have a complete copy of uniform regulations (AR 670-1) on hand to readily reference while maintaining and assembling the general officer’s uniforms. Documenting with photos the placement of decorations, insignias ribbons, badges and other uniform accessories is highly recommended when developing your continuity book. A. Overview The appearance of the general officers daily or dress uniform is not only a reflection of him or her, but also of you. The uniform can be viewed as a symbol of our military power and strength. Ensuring that the general officer’s uniform is prepared to the highest standard is the duty of the enlisted aide. B. Care of Uniforms Equipment Needed Washer and Dryer Top loading washers.

Common washers that have been around for many years. Follow these simple tips for keeping the washing machine clean and ready for use: 1. Fill the washer with hot water. Add 1 quart of chlorine bleach - no detergent, and let the machine agitate for a minute, then let it sit for one hour. 2. After one hour, allow the washer to run through its longest wash and spin cycle. 3. Immediately fill the washer with hot water again and add 1 quart distilled white vinegar. Let agitate for a minute and sit for one hour. NOTE: Using the bleach and vinegar will clean away bacteria, soap scum and mineral deposits from the wash basket and hoses. This is especially important if you live in a hard water area and should be done every three months. Every top loading washer should be cleaned at least twice per year.

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4. If your machine has built-in dispensers, clean those too. If your dispensers aren’t removable, warm 1 cup of white vinegar in the microwave or in a small saucepan. Pour it into the dispenser and allow it to sit for a few minutes to loosen any build up. 5. After an hour, run the longest wash and spin cycle again. Front loading washers.

These types of washing machines are often catagorized as High Efficiency (HE) washing machines, and only take detergent specially made for these types of machines so the enlisted aide should take extra care when purchasing detergent. These machines also should be cleaned (inside drum) once per month using the following steps: 1. Make sure there is no laundry in the washer. Fill the washing machine with hot water on the largest load setting. 2. Add 2 cups of vinegar to the water to get rid of odor problems. Most HE washers should have a “clean cycle” on it and you can add vinegar or bleach on that setting. 3. Allow the washing machine to run through a complete wash and rinse cycle. 4. Fill the washer a second time with hot water, also on the largest load setting. 5. Add 2 cups of bleach to the water to help with stain removal. 6. Again, allow the machine to run through a complete wash and rinse cycle. 7. If all of the stains are removed, run an additional cycle without adding anything to the water. This will thoroughly rinse away any remaining residue. 8. Remove the bleach dispenser and fabric softener dispenser and soak them in a bucket of warm water. When they have soaked long enough, remove them from the water, lay them on a towel, and spray them with an all-purpose spray cleaner. Wipe away any dirt with the towel. 9. Dry the dispensers and return them to their original places in the machine.

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10. Finally, inspect the rubber door seal for mold and mildew. Pull back the seal to examine the hidden crevices. Mix 1 cup of liquid chlorine bleach with 1 gallon of warm water. Moisten a clean white cloth with the bleach water solution, and then wipe down the seal to remove any mold and mildew. Allow the solution to remain on the seal for five minutes, and then wipe down the door seal with a clean, dry white cloth.

Performing the cleaning operation on a front loading washer is very important due to the fact that if ignored, over time the clothes can be stained. Iron.

Enlisted aides should ensure that the iron being used both at the residence and when traveling is reliable and maintained properly. Irons used should have the following options fro best results when maintaining the general officer’s clothes: Variable steam settings. Check that the water reservoir is easy to fill and the iron has a few steam vents. Non-stick coated finish or stainless steel soleplate. This helps the iron to glide easily and not stick, helps to protect the fabric and makes ironing quicker. Swivel cord base. Allows for easy handling of the iron. Variable heat/fabric settings. Since the enlisted aide will be using the iron on fine linens and clothes this option is especially important. Ironing board.

Free-standing ironing boards are the most common ones found in most households. They are sturdy enough so they won't collapse while ironing, while lightweight enough to be easily moved from room to room. Hamper.

Suggest to the general officer that more than one clothes/linen hamper will allow for easier cleaning of linens or uniform items. Storage area/closet.

This is very important when it comes to properly storing the linens used for entertaining and special events. Steamer.

Steamers can be divided into two primary categories: hand-held or compact steamers and professional steamers. Both kinds of steamers provide different advantages. Enlisted aides should consider purchasing a hand-held steamer that may be used when travelling with the general officer. At the

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residence, the enlisted aide will have a much larger variety of tools used for this purpose.

Shoe trees. Shoe trees are essential tools for storing shoes and packing the shoes for

travel. Plastic bin/Tool box.

A variety of uniform maintenance items should be kept in this “toolbox” for use by the enlisted aide. Cap cover/bag.

A cap cover is used for inclement weather and traveling purposes. Laundry bag.

Should always carry two of these for travelling purposes. Suit valet.

A suit valet is a must have for long term storing of uniforms and suits as well as for travelling. Essential Materials Required The following list of materials is the minimum recommended tools that will allow for an enlisted aide to fulfill their uniform maintenance duties. 1. Water (distilled) 7. Sewing kit 2. Starch 8. Shoe shine kit 3. Laundry detergent 9. Stain remover

4. Fabric softener 10. Hangers 5. Spray bottle 11. Garment Bags 6. Lint brush Key Uniform Components

1. Trousers 7. Tie 2. Head gear 8. Ribbons and devices 3. Coat/Jacket 9. Rank and insignia 4. Shirt, white dress 10. Badges 5. Belt with buckle 11. PT uniform 6. Shoes 12. Undergarments

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C. Tips for a Perfect Wash 1. Read the clothing labels. 2. Test for colorfastness. 3. Sort and separate loads. 4. Pre-treat stains. 5. Pour in detergent based on recommended instructions on the manufacturer’s label. 6. Load the machine. 7. Set the time. 8. Choose a wash cycle. 9. Select water temperature (ALWAYS check for proper setting).

D. Ironing Basics Whenever ironing the general officer’s clothing, keep these basic guidelines in mind: The ironing board should be sturdy. A good-quality iron will have reliable temperature settings and a powerful steam, will be less likely to drip, and will glide smoothly. A nonstick soleplate glides beautifully when new, but will almost inevitably get scratched. Always use as much moisture and steam as the fabric can take, and use a pressing cloth to reduce shine on fabrics like wool or to reduce heat on delicates. When choosing the temperature setting, start at the lower end of the range, and increase if necessary.

E. Sewing Tips Purchase a small, convenient size sewing kit. Look inside the clothing for the extra buttons that manufacturers sometimes include, or buy one that matches the size and color of the other buttons.

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Choose thread that either matches the thread color used on the other buttons, the color of the button or the color of the material. You can put a match or toothpick in between the button and the material to maintain proper spacing between cloth and button.

F. Shoe Shining Tips There are two kinds of shoe polish: cream or paste polish and wax polish. Cream or Paste polish - moisturizes fine leather and keeps it flexible. It soaks into the leather and allows leather to breathe. Most cream or paste polishes contain mineral oil. They can help restore shoe color, but are not as good as wax polishes for covering scuffs. Wax polish - shines leather better than cream, but it seals the leather and can cause it to dry out over time. Most wax polishes contain Stoddar Solvent (Naphtha) or turpentine plus Carnauba and/or Beeswax. Wax is the most effective for covering scuffs. NOTE: Avoid liquid polish, although it puts a fast shine on your shoes it can dry out and crack the leather. Clean the shoes periodically with leather cleaner. Then put in cedar shoetrees and let the shoes air dry. Shoes should never be put close to heat sources, which can dry out the leather. When shoes are dry, you can apply conditioner if needed and polish. Follow these simple steps to keep the footwear of the general officer in perfect condition: 1. Change into some old clothes. 2. Clear an area and put down newspaper. 3. Remove all dust and dirt by wiping the shoe, especially the heel and sole, with a cloth. 4. Shoes will be easier to shine if you leave your shoetrees inside the shoe. 5. Make sure the polish matches the shoes. 6. Apply the polish with a soft, clean polishing rag; an old sock will work fine. Apply polish to the first shoe and let it soak in while you apply polish to the other. Start from the heel, toward the toe on one side, and back to the heel on the other, applying the polish evenly in a circular motion. Excess polish doesn’t help and takes longer to dry.

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7. Allow the shoes to dry about 10 minutes. 8. Buff the shoe with a polishing brush, preferably horsehair, and use a soft clean cloth (ladies hose work well) to bring out a high luster. 9. Liquid sole and edge dressing may be used to restore the edge of the soles. NOTE: Keep shoetrees in the shoes when they are not being worn. G. Dress Uniforms: Army Blue Dress and Mess Dress Reference - AR 670-1 Ch. 20-26 1. Because of less frequent wear, use particular care when cleaning or storing dress uniforms. 2. Clean uniforms according to manufacturer's label instructions. When they are professionally dry-cleaned, request the lapels not be pressed into the body of the blouse. 3. Gold braid on dress uniforms may deteriorate if improperly handled; special care must be taken to ensure these surfaces do not endure rough treatment. 4. High humidity or sharp temperature changes will also cause tarnishing if the uniform is not adequately protected. 5. An airtight plastic clothing bag with a packet of desiccant (drying agent) enclosed will give greatest protection; use the dry cleaners plastic sleeve at a minimum. Place the uniform carefully on a substantial hanger and store in a dry, cool, well-ventilated closet.

NOTE: It is not necessary to break down a uniform and send it to the cleaners each time it has been worn. Most times you will be able to steam or press the back of the blouse and perform a spot check of the ribbons and accoutrements. Always check with the general officer before removing items. As a back-up, check with the aide-de-camp to insure there are no scheduling conflicts before breaking down a uniform. Once again, the importance of enlisted aide attending the weekly staff meeting cannot be over emphasized. H. Service Uniforms: Army Service Uniform Service uniforms use the same care required for dress uniforms. However, due to more constant use, the enlisted aide may benefit some additional measures. As heat, friction, and pressure have a deteriorating effect on materials, service uniforms generally show more wear at creased areas. This

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may be partially offset by investing in a steamer which can rid the article of wrinkles and not press the crease needlessly. Sleeve cuffs and trousers/slacks/skirt hems should be periodically examined and turned if material permits. Dry-cleaning preserves the original appearance and finish of wool and polyester/wool garments and is recommended over hand laundering. Uniform items manufactured of polyester/cotton should not be bleached or starched. I. Utility Uniforms

Army Combat Uniform The following instructions must be followed when caring for the Army Combat Uniform (ACU) in order to maximize the service life and maintain optimum performance: Soldiers will not starch the ACU under any circ*mstances. The use of starch, sizing, and any process that involves dry-cleaning or a steam press will adversely affect the treatments and durability of the uniform and is not authorized. Wash in cold water and mild detergent containing no optical brighteners or bleach. Tumble dry at low heat (not to exceed 130 degrees Fahrenheit). Remove immediately from the dryer and fold flat or place on a rustproof hanger to ensure heat from the dryer does not set wrinkles. To drip dry, remove from the washer and place on a rustproof hanger. Do not wring or twist. Undershirts 1. Wash in cold or warm water. 2. Do not use bleach or detergents which contain bleaching agents. 3. Tumble dry on the permanent press cycle but do not over dry. 4. Lightly press the undershirt and fold as appropriate, place in designated area. J. Army Physical Fitness Uniform (APFU) 1. Wash in warm or cold water. 2. Dry on low heat. 3. Hang up immediately when dry. K. Uniform Requirements - TDY Trip Preparation As an enlisted aide one of the prescribed duties may be to travel from time to time with the general officer on official business. If required, please follow the

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guidelines below to ensure that the proper uniforms are prepared and packed for the trip. Establish the 5Ws NOTE: Refer to Kiss, Bow, or Shake Hands; ISBN 1-55850-444-3 1. Who is the general officer going to meet? 2. What is the purpose of the trip? 3. Where is s/he going? 4. When is the general officer going? 5. Why is s/he going on this trip? 6. How long will the general officer be gone?

As previously stated it is noteworthy that the enlisted aide should sit in on

staff meetings especially before a TDY trip in order to have enough time to prepare the required uniforms prior to the travel engagement. Travel Checklist NOTE: Refer to the travel folder in the Enlisted Aide Training Course CD (located on the JCCoE webpage). Coordinate with the general officer or the aide-de-camp on the itinerary and determine uniforms, accessories, and clothing items required for the travel period. Always check with the general officer for specific instructions by either preparing a packing list of clothing and present it to the general officer for approval or pack the day prior and leave it out for inspection. If necessary, make requested changes received from the general officer. a. Select the appropriate uniforms and clothing required. b. Pack electrical adapters when traveling to a foreign country. c. Check availability and quality of comfort items to include towels, pillows and bathroom tissue. d. Select the luggage needed and pack in such a manner as to prevent wrinkling but insure as little movement within the bag as possible. Coordinate with the aide-de-camp regarding any specific instructions to assist you with packing.

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e. Cell phone: Ensure that you have charger and overseas adapters. f. Brief Case: Personal and official business documents, binders, folders, books. g. Passport: Double check expiration date (tourist blue and official brown). h. Comfort Kit: Drinks & snacks for the general officer from the likes and dislikes list. i. Bathroom Kit: Shaving cream, lotion, razors, adapters, tooth paste, tooth brush, fingernail clipper. j. Medicine/Vitamin Kit: Coordinate with the general officer or spouse for a list of prescriptions and vitamins. k. Suitcase: Assist w/packing and utilize check-off list. l. Garment Bag: Pack uniforms to support official events and meetings. m. Prescription glasses/contacts/reading glasses/sun glasses. n. Personal entertainment equipment: iPod, iPad, CD player, DVD player, Headphones. o. Laptop computer. p. Sewing Kit. q. Dress Shoes. r. Civilian Shoes (loafers, boots, etc). s. Shower Shoes. t. Pants (casual and dress). u. Oxford Shirt (white). v. Socks. w. Undergarments. x. Neck Tie.

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y. Polo Shirts. z. Sports Coat (blue or black). aa. Belt (black or brown). bb. Sweater (weather permitting). cc. Walking Shorts (weather permitting). dd. Hat and Gloves. ee. PT Gear (shorts, shirt, running shoes). Setting Up Uniforms, Clothing and Toiletries at the TDY Location Upon arrival at TDY site, it is recommended that the enlisted aide stage clothing and comfort items in the general officer’s hotel room. The enlisted aide should inspect, store, and prepare all clothing and travel related items for the general officer in a timely manner upon arrival at the travel site. Check for tears, missing buttons, and or stained items. Place t-shirts, underwear and socks in proper drawer space. Place uniforms and civilian attire on hangers in closet. Place shoes on floor in closet. Place toiletries or shaving kit in bathroom. Prepare uniform or civilian attire for official business.

XIII. Uniform Assembly A. Overview Uniform Assembly will probably be one of the most challenging duties that you as an enlisted aide will have to perform, but it will also be very satisfying in the end. The general officer is a reflection of your commitment, dedication, and faithful attention to detail. Take your time, have confidence, patience, and utilize the tools in your bag to set a standard of excellence. B. Helpful tips for assembling the uniform In most instances, the enlisted aide will prepare the general officer’s uniform for both the normal duty day and for special occasions. The applicable regulations (depending on the Service of the general officer) will always be the guide when preparing the uniform. However, it is crucial to know the general

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officer's preference for particular spacing requirements. Always ask the general officer if there are any specific requirements that are unique to them when it comes to preparing a uniform. The enlisted aide should document the placement of the general officer’s uniform accoutrements (additional items of dress or equipment). Attach rank, medals, and ribbons to the uniform. A seamstress’ ruler will ensure the greatest accuracy for spacing and placement. Hang and display uniform in dressing area. Always recheck the retaining clasps and placement of ribbons and medals to ensure proper placement. Accessories, Decorations, and Insignia Reference - AR 670-1 Inspect all items for torn, worn, or soiled areas. Repair or, if necessary, replace torn/worn items with new ones. Clean and re-place items; always clean/buff silver and brass accoutrements and awards.

Wear of Decorations, Service Medals, Badges, Unit Awards, and Appurtenances Reference - AR 670-1 Always check before placing decorations, service medals, badges, unit awards, and appurtenances. Putting on an unauthorized decoration or award could cause embarrassment to the general officer, so when in doubt always check first before finalizing a uniform. This is especially important during formal occasions. The enlisted aide should pay special attention to the following: 1. Decoration / medals order of precedence. 2. Placement of ribbons on the uniform. 3. Wear of miniature decorations and service medals. 4. Wear of combat and special skills badges. 5. Wear of foreign badges.

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United States Army Uniforms

Army Combat Uniform (ACUs):

Army Blue Mess Jacket: Miniature decorations and service medals: The maximum length of holding bars for miniature medals is 2 3/4 inches. Miniature decorations and service medals are worn in the order of precedence from the wearer’s right to left, with the medal of highest precedence worn on the top row, if more than one row is required. Miniature medals are worn side by side when four or less are worn in the same row, and they may be overlapped. If the medals are overlapped, the overlap will not exceed 50 percent and will be equal for all medals. When more than one row of miniature medals are worn, the second and subsequent rows are positioned so that the medal pendants on the row below are visible. The top row of miniature medals is centered over the row immediately below. Miniature medals are worn as follows: Male: Miniature medals are worn centered on the left lapel, approximately 1/2 inch below the notch of the mess and evening mess uniforms and will not extend beyond the edge of the lapel. Personnel may adjust the placement of the medals to accommodate wearing dress miniature badges (see fig 22–7). Female: Miniature medals are worn centered on the left lapel of the Army blue mess and the new versions of the white mess uniforms. On the old version of the white mess jackets, females wear the medals centered on the wearer’s left side of the jacket (not on the lapels) and positioned parallel to a similar position to where the top edge of the wearer’s blue uniform coat top button normally rests. The position is similar for the blue mess and evening mess uniforms (see fig 22–

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8). Females may adjust placement of the medals to conform to differences in individual body shape.

Figure 22–7 Figure 22–8 Figure 22-65

Metal tab replicas, miniature. Miniature metal tab replicas are worn on mess and evening mess uniforms (see fig 22–65). They may also be worn on dress uniforms only when miniature medals are worn. See paragraph 22–16c for further guidance on wear of miniature metal tab replicas in DA PAM 670-1 Placement of Identification Badges: Male: On the mess and evening mess uniforms, the ID badge is worn centered between the upper two buttons of the jacket, with one inch between badges when two are worn on the same side (see fig 22–80). Female: On the mess and evening mess uniforms, ID badges are worn centered between the lower two buttons of the jacket, with one inch between badges when two are worn on the same side (see fig 22–83). Personnel are authorized to wear full-size ID badges on the mess and evening mess uniforms when the badges are not available in miniature size.

Figure 22–80 Figure 22–83

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Placement of the Regimental Distinctive Insignia: Male: On the white and blue mess and evening mess uniforms, male personnel wear the RDI on the right lapel. On the blue mess uniform, the RDI is worn centered on the satin facing, 1/2 inch below the notch in the lapel. On the white mess uniform, the RDI is worn 1/2 inch below the notch, centered on the lapel. The RDI is worn so that the vertical axis of the insignia is perpendicular to the ground (see fig 21–138). Female: On the blue mess and evening mess, and the new version white mess and evening mess uniforms, females wear the RDI centered on the right lapel, with the top of the RDI aligned with the top row of miniature medals. On the old version white mess and evening mess uniforms, females wear the RDI centered on the right side of the jacket (not on the lapels). The RDI is centered between the lapel and shoulder seam, with the top of the RDI aligned with the top row of miniature medals. The RDI is worn so that the vertical axis is perpendicular to the ground.

Figure 21-138 Figure 29-1 Figure 29-2

Army Service Uniform (ASUs): Placement of Ribbons: On the coats of the Army blue, and the AG shade 415 shirt, males wear the ribbons centered 1⁄8 inch above the left breast pocket. Ribbons are worn in order of precedence from the wearer’s right to left, in one or more rows, with either no space between rows or 1⁄8-inch space between rows. No more than four ribbons are worn in any one row. Soldiers will not start a second row unless they are authorized to wear four or more ribbons. The determination of whether three or four ribbons are worn in each row is based upon the size of the coat and the position of the lapel. The first and second rows will contain the same number of ribbons (three or four) before starting a third row. The third and succeeding rows will contain the same number of ribbons as the first two rows, but may contain less. The top row is centered on the row beneath, or may be aligned to the wearer’s left, whichever presents the best appearance (see fig 29–1). Ribbon mounts will remain centered above the pocket even if the top ribbon row is offset (see fig 29–2).

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Combat and special skill badges will be worn 1/4 inch above the ribbons or the top of the pocket, one above the other, in order of group precedence from top to bottom, with 1/2 inch between badges, or they are worn on the pocket flap equally spaced on the pocket flap, from left to right, with the upper portion of the badges approximately 1/8 inch below the top of the pocket, and at least 1 inch between badges. In those instances where the coat lapel obscures the ribbons or medals, personnel may wear the badges aligned with the left edge of the ribbons or medals (see fig 22-58). A total of six combat and special skill badges are authorized for wear at one time on service and dress uniforms (see fig 22–56); this total does not include special skill tabs or special skill tab metal replicas.

Figure 22–58 Figure 22-56

Special skill tab metal replicas may be worn with other special skill badges or marksmanship badges or tab on the pocket flap. Males will wear the special skill tab metal replicas and Presidents Hundred tab 1/8 inch below the top of the pocket equally spaced with other badges and tabs and between the left and right side of the pocket flap. Females wear special skill tab metal replicas with the upper portion of the tab 1/4 inch below the ribbon bar equally spaced under the ribbon bar. Soldiers may wear special skill badges or marksmanship badges 1/4 inch below lowest portion of the metal tab replica(s) only if the Soldier has more than three combined special skill tab metal replicas, special skill badges, and/or marksmanship badges or tab on the pocket flap, or in a similar location without pockets. Any special skill badges worn under metal tab replicas on the pocket flap will be worn in order of precedence by group from the wearer’s right to left. Special skill tab metal replicas may not be worn above the ribbons. See figure 22–62 for wear of special skill tab metal replicas with other badges on the pocket flap.

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Figure 22–62

Wearing identification badges: Personnel may wear no more than two ID badges on one pocket or side of the coat of the uniforms prescribed below. When two ID badges are worn on the same side or pocket, the precedence of the badges is from the wearer’s right (highest) to left (lowest), as listed in paragraph a, above. When more than two badges are awarded that are worn on the same side, the individual may determine which two badges are worn on the uniform (see fig 22–79). ID badges are worn as follows: Male: On service and dress uniforms and the service uniform shirt, ID badges are worn centered on the pocket of the coat or shirt. The badge is centered between the bottom of the pocket flap and the bottom of the pocket, and centered from left to right. When two badges are worn on the same side, they are spaced equally from left to right on the pocket (see fig 22–79). Personnel may wear miniature ID badges on the Class B version (service uniform) shirts, but may not mix full size ID badges with miniature badges unless badges are not available (manufactured) in miniature size. Female: On service and dress uniforms, the ID badge is worn parallel to the waistline on the green and blue coats, with 1 inch between badges when two are worn on the same side (see fig 22–81). Badges are worn in a comparable position on the maternity tunic and the service uniform shirts. If no other awards, decorations, or insignia (other than the nameplate and rank) are worn on the Class B version (service uniform) shirts, females may place the ID badge parallel to the nameplate, or approximately 1 inch above the nameplate, depending upon which side the badge is worn (see fig 22–82). Females may adjust placement of badges to conform to individual body-shape differences. Personnel may wear miniature badges on the Class B version (service uniform) shirts. Position and wear of identification badges: Badges are worn as prescribed in DA PAM 670-1. Badges are worn first on the prescribed side, then using the order of precedence described in DA PAM 670--1.

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Figure 22-79 Figure 22-81 Placement of the Combat Service Identification Badge: Badge is centered between the bottom of the pocket flap and the bottom of the pocket centered from left to right. Personnel may move the Army Staff badge or any badge with lower precedence (normally worn on the wear’s right side) to the wearer’s left side when wearing the combat service ID badge on the service uniform, Army blue, mess and evening mess uniforms. This allows the CSIB to stand alone on the right side or be worn with other right side badges. Personnel authorized to wear more than four ID badges have the option of choosing the badges worn, as long as they comply with the wear policy outlined in DA PAM 670-1. Personnel must wear the badges on the side authorized for wear and in the order of precedence outlined as well. If badges are moved from the right side, they are worn in the order of precedence noted in DA PAM 670-1. Placement of Unit Awards: All permanent and temporary unit award emblems, with or without frames, are worn in the order of precedence from the wearer’s right to left. Award emblems are worn in rows containing no more than three emblems per row, with no space between emblems, and with up to 1/8 inch space between rows, depending upon the size of emblems with frames. The emblems are worn as follows: Male: Emblems with or without frames are worn centered with the bottom edge of the emblem 1/8 inch above the right breast pocket flap (see fig 22–13). Female: Emblems with or without frames are worn centered on the right side of the uniform, with the bottom edge 1/2 inch above the top edge of the nameplate (see fig 22–14).

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Figure 21-13 Male Figure 21-14 Female

Regimental Distinctive Insignia (RDI): Male: On the service (green or blue) uniforms and the service uniform shirts, wear the RDI centered 1/8 inch above the top of the pocket flap or 1/4 inch above any unit awards or foreign badges that are worn (see fig 21–137). When the coat lapel obscures the insignia, Soldiers may wear the RDI aligned to the right edge of unit awards or the nameplate. Wearing the RDI on the service uniform shirt is optional. Female: On the green and blue uniforms, the service uniform shirts, and maternity tunic, wear the RDI centered 1/2 inch above the nameplate or 1/4 inch above any unit awards or foreign badges that are worn. When the coat lapel obscures the RDI, Soldiers may wear the RDI aligned to the right edge of unit awards or the nameplate. Wearing the RDI on the service uniform shirt is optional (see fig 21-140).

Figure 21-137 Figure 21-140

Nameplate Male: On the service uniform shirts, and on the coats of the green and blue service/dress uniforms, the nameplate is worn centered left to right on the flap of the right breast pocket, and centered between the top of the button and the top of the pocket (see fig 21-137).

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Female: On the Army green uniform, the new style Army blue uniform and ASU, the nameplate is worn 1 to 2 inches above the top button of the coat and centered horizontally on the wearer’s right side (see fig 21–140). On the service uniform shirts and maternity tunic the nameplate is worn in a comparable position (see fig 21-140). Placement of the U.S. insignia Male: On the Army green and blue uniform coats, officers wear the U.S. insignia 5/8 inch above the notch on both collars, with the centerline of the insignia bisecting the notch, and parallel to the inside edge of the lapel (see fig 21–18). Female: There are two versions of the blue uniform coats: the old version produced prior to 10 August 1992, and the new version produced after that date. On the old version of the blue uniform coat, the U.S. insignia is centered 1 inch above the notch on the right collar, with the centerline of the insignia bisecting the notch, and parallel to the inside edge of the lapel (see fig 21–19). On the new version of the blue uniform coat, and on the Army green coat, the U.S. insignia is centered on both collars, approximately 5/8 inch up from center of the collar and lapel seam, with the centerline of the insignia parallel to the inside edge of the lapel (see fig 21–20).

Figure 21-18 Figure 21-19 Figure 21-20

Placement of shoulder Straps General officers: The insignia is the appropriate number of silver-colored stars, each 5/8 inch in diameter. All stars are worn with one point facing the neck. Stars on the shoulder straps are placed point to point. On each shoulder, the shoulder strap is sewn, snapped, or hooked to the coat of the Army blue uniform, centered lengthwise on the outside shoulder seam (see fig 21-60).

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Figure 21-60 Placement of shoulder marks: Shoulder marks for officers are black with a 1/8-inch yellow stripe below the embroidered grade insignia. Shoulder marks come in two sizes to accommodate differences in the manufacturing of shoulder loops on shirts and sweaters. All personnel may wear either size of the shoulder marks. The shoulder mark fits the shoulder loop properly when the buttons are completely exposed, enabling exact alignment of the fastening of buttons. General officers shoulder marks are worn with the single point of the stars facing towards the neck while worn (see fig 21-58).

Figure 21-58 Beret How worn and placement of grade insignia: The beret is worn so that the headband (edge binding) is straight across the forehead, 1 inch above the eyebrows. The flash is positioned over the left eye, and the excess materials is draped over to the right ear, extending to at least the top of the ear, and no lower than the middle of the ear. When worn properly, the beret is formed to the shape of the head. General officers wear the appropriate number of stars centered on the beret flash, point to point (see fig 21-30). General officers may wear medium or miniature stars in lieu of regular-sized stars. As an option, general officers may mount full-sized, medium, or miniature

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stars on a bar for wear on coats, jackets, and the beret. When this option is chosen, the bar is worn centered on the shoulder loop or beret flash.

Figure 21-30

United States Marine Corps Uniforms

Desert Utility Uniform and Woodland Combat Utility:

Evening Dress “B” Jacket:

Placement of Miniature Medals, Insignia and ID Badge Miniature medals will be centered on the left-front panel of the jacket midway between the inner edge and the left armhole seam, with the top of the holding bar on line with the second blind buttonhole. The miniature insignia (aviator wings) will be placed on the left-front panel on a line 1/8 inch above the second blind buttonhole, and spaced

midway between the inner edge and left armhole seam.

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ID Badge: If worn will be placed on the left front panel with the top of the badge centered 1 inch below the bottom edge of the miniature medals. Service “A” Uniform:

Placement of ribbons, rifle/pistol badges and breast insignias: Ribbon bars will be centered 1/8 inch above and parallel to the top edge of the upper left pocket of dress "B" coat, service coats, and men's khaki shirts. When marksmanship badges are worn, ribbon bars will be centered over the pocket with the bottom edge of the ribbon bar 1/8 inch above the widest holding bar of the marksmanship badge(s).

Badges are worn, according to seniority, centered above the left breast pocket, with the bottom edge of the highest holding bar 1/8 inch above the pocket's top edge. The top edges of all badges will be aligned. When men wear two rifle/pistol badges, they are symmetrically placed on a line with about 3/4 inch space between holding bars, but in no case will they span more than 4 1/4 inches. Authorized insignia will be worn on the left breast of all service and dress coats. It may be worn at the individual's option on khaki shirts worn as the outer garment (with or without ribbons), utility coats or the maternity work uniform coats. Either anodized or oxidized breast insignia may be worn at the individual’s option on the service uniforms, but mixing of anodized and oxidized breast insignia is not authorized. When worn with medals, ribbons, or membership badges, the bottom of the insignia will be centered 1/8 inch above the top row of such awards. NOTE: When successively decreasing rows of ribbon bars are worn and the top row of ribbons is such that centering the insignia presents an unsatisfactory appearance, the insignia may be centered between the outer edge of the coat lapel and the left edge of the vertically aligned ribbon rows.

Placement of Identification Badges: No more than two service/identification badges will be worn on the same side of the uniform. When two badges are worn, they will be worn vertically aligned on the upper pocket or corresponding position on uniforms that do not have pockets in this position. On pockets with flaps, these badges will be vertically centered between the lower point of the flap and bottom of the pocket, midway between the two sides. The ID

Badge is centered on the upper left pocket. On pockets with flaps, the badge will

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be centered between the lower point of the flap and the bottom of the pocket and midway between the two sides.

Placement of the stars on jacket: General officers' stars will be worn equally spaced between the armhole seam and the shoulder strap button or edge of the collar, whichever is closer. One ray of each star points toward the collar. Shoulder stars are 1 inch in diameter and are either fastened together on a metal holding bar or placed individually with one point of each star in the same line; distance between the centers of adjacent stars will be 3/4 inch.

Service “B” Uniform: Placement of ribbons, insignia and rifle/pistol bade on the Service “B”

Uniform. The service "B" uniform (with long sleeve shirt and tie) is the same as the service "A" uniform except that the service coat is not worn. Ribbons will be centered left to right and 1/8 inch above the pistol or rifle badge which centered above the left breast pocket, with the bottom edge of the highest holding bar 1/8 inch above the pocket's top edge. The bottom of the breast insignia will be centered 1/8 inch above the top row of ribbons.

Placement of stars on the collar of shirt: Collar grade insignia will be worn on both sides of the collar of khaki shirts, and the utility. The insignia will be centered between the top and bottom edge of the collar, with the outer edge of the insignia one inch from the front edge of the collar. General officers' stars will be worn with one ray of each star pointing toward the top edge of the collar.

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Marine Corps Hat: Placement of stars on the hat: Collar grade insignia will be worn on the right side of the garrison cap opposite to the branch of service collar insignia, with the insignia placed at a point midway on the arc of the flap and the flap generally bisecting the insignia. Generals' stars will be worn with one ray of each star pointing toward the top of the cap, with the long axis horizontal.

United States Navy Uniforms

All information for the proper wear and rigging on US NAVY uniforms can be found in United States Navy Uniform Regulations, NAVPERS 156651.

US Navy Working Uniform (NWUs):

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Navy Dinner Dress White and Blue Jacket:

Placement of miniature medals, insignias and badges: Place the holding bar of the lowest row of miniature medals 3 inches below the notch, centered on the lapel, parallel to the deck. The 1st breast insignia is centered above medals with the lower edge of the device ¼ inch above the top row of medals. 2nd breast insignia is centered below medals with the top of the device ¼ inch below the lowest row of medals. Identification badge will be centered ¼ inch below the lowest row of miniature

medals or secondary breast insignia.

NOTE: The Tuxedo shirt will be worn with both of these jackets. Cuff Links and Shirt studs are required. Navy Full Dress White and Blue Service Coat:

Placement of large medals, insignias, ID Badge and ribbons: Wear both large medals and ribbons that do not have corresponding large medals on Full Dress Uniforms. Place the holding bar of the lowest row of large medals ¼ inch above pocket flap. Arrange ribbons in order of precedence in rows from top down and inboard to outboard and center ribbons on the right breast ¼ inch above pocket flap. Center the breast insignia ¼ inch above medals. The identification badge will be centered ¼ inch below

the lowest row of medals or secondary breast insignia. Navy Full Dress Blue:

Follow the same instructions as above. Due to there not being a pocket on the left breast of this jacket, draw an imaginary line from the right breast pocket and place the ribbons ½ above that line. If a Second ID Badge is to be worn it will be centered on the left breast parallel with the first ID Badge on the right.

NOTE: The sword, full dress belt and white gloves may be worn in this uniform depending on the occasion.

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Navy Service Dress Blue:

Placement of ribbons, breast insignia and ID Badge: Ribbons will be centered and placed ¼ inch above pocket flap. 1st breast insignia will be ¼ inch centered above ribbons if authorized a second insignia will be place ¼ inch below pocket seam. The Identification Badge will be centered on the left breast pocket. Name tag which is optional will be worn on the right side, centered between the edge of the lapel and seam of right shoulder and parallel with the bottom line of the ribbon rack.

Navy Summer White:

Center nametag ¼ inch above the right breast pocket. On uniforms without a right breast pocket, place nametag on the right front in a position corresponding

to ribbons on the left. Nametags are rectangular not exceeding dimensions of 1 inch by 3½ inches, and may be of any color and design as long as the nametag is standard throughout the command. Ribbon rack is ¼” above the Left Breast Pocket seam. Breast Insignia is ¼” above Ribbons. Secondary Insignia will be ¼” below left pocket seam. Identification Badge will be centered on the Left breast pocket (point of pocket and bottom of pocket seam). Hard shoulder boards are worn on dinner dress, the service white coat and summer white for officers and the unfouled arm of the stock will always point to the front of the wearer (right and left).

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Navy Service Khaki Uniform:

Placement of ribbons, breast insignia, and ID Badge and name tag: Ribbon rack will be centered and placed ¼ inch above the left breast pocket seam. 1st breast insignia will be centered and placed ¼” above ribbons. Secondary breast insignia will be centered and place ¼” below left pocket seam. Identification Badge will be centered left to right on the left breast pocket (point of pocket and bottom of pocket seam. Name tag will be centered ¼” above right pocket seam.

1 star placement: Wear miniature sized metal grade insignia on the collar points of khaki shirts. 1 star placement: Center the insignia 1 inch from the front and lower edges of the collar and position the vertical axis of the insignia along an imaginary line bisecting the angle of the collar point.

2 star placements: Center the insignia 1 inch from the front and lower edges of the collar and position the vertical axis of the insignia along an imaginary line bisecting the angle of the collar point. 3 star placements: Place the stars on an imaginary line top of collar with the center star bisecting the collar point. The stars should be evenly spaced from side to side.

4 star placements: Place the stars on an imaginary line top of collar with the center star bisecting the collar point. The stars should be evenly spaced from side to side.

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Garrison Cap: Placement of stars and device: The stars and device on the garrison cap will be placed 2 inches from the front edge of cap and 1 ½ inches from the bottom of cap. Both measurements will be to the center of the star(s) or device.

Black Jacket (Eisenhower):

Placement of insignia on jacket: Wear regular size metal grade insignia centered on shoulder straps of blue all-weather coats, khaki jackets, blue jackets and black jackets. Place the outer edge of each device ¾ inch from the squared end of the shoulder strap. Flag Officers will wear the insignia lengthwise on the strap so that the single rays of each star points toward the collar.

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United States Air Force Uniforms

US Air Force Battle Uniform:

Air Force Mess Dress:

Placement of miniature medals, duty of ID Badge and Occupational badge: Miniature medals will be centered on the wearer’s left between the lapel and arm seam and midway between the top shoulder seam and top button of the coat. Occupational badge will be worn on the wearer’s left side centered ½ inch above the highest row of medals. Duty/ID badge will be centered on the wearer’s left ½ inch below the bottom row of medals.

Air Force Service Dress Uniform:

Placement of the US lapel insignia: US insignia will be placed halfway up the seam, resting on but not over it. The US letters in the insignia are parallel with the ground.

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Placement of ribbons and occupational badge: Wear ribbons centered, resting on (but not over) the edge of the welt pocket. The first badge will be worn on the wearer’s left side centered ½ inch above the highest row of ribbons. The second badge will be centered ½ inch above the first badge. Placement of the first duty badge: ID/duty badge will be centered on the wearer’s left 1½ inch below top of welt pocket and centered left to right.

Placement of second ID/duty badge and name tag: Badge will be worn on the wearer’s right 1 ½ inch below the name tag. If authorized, center a third badge ½ inch above the name tag. The name tag is metal engraved, brushed satin silver finish with the last name engraved in blue lettering. The name tag will be centered on the wearer’s right between the sleeve seam and lapel and the bottom of name tag will be parallel with bottom of ribbons. The

total number of badges worn will not exceed four.

Placement of stars on jacket: General officers will wear 1 inch stars point-to-center; ¾ inch stars are optional, if unable to wear the 1 inch stars. Generals will evenly space all four stars between the button securing the epaulet and the sleeve seam. Lieutenant Generals will place one star on the center point of the epaulet and center the two remaining

stars between the first star and the button securing the epaulet and the sleeve seam. Major Generals will evenly space their stars between the center point of the epaulet and the button securing the epaulet and the sleeve seam.

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Brigadier Generals will center their star between the button securing the epaulet and the sleeve seam.

Air Force Flight Cap:

Placement of the stars on the General Officer flight cap: Rank insignia will be worn on the wearer’s left with the first star 1 ½ inches from the front edge of the flight cap. The bottom two points of the stars will be parallel with the bottom of the flight cap. Stars will be lined up one immediately after the other. General officers will wear 1 inch stars or ¾ inch stars if unable to wear the 1 inch stars.

Air Force Class “B” Uniform: Placement of the ribbons, occupational badge and duty/ID Badge: All or no ribbons and devices will be worn. If worn, ribbons will be centered, resting on, but not over the edge of the pleated pocket on the wearers left. The first badge will be worn on the wearer’s left side centered ½ inch above the highest row of ribbons. The total number of badges worn will not exceed four. All occupational

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badges worn will be the same size; mid-sized or regular. The first duty/ID badge will be centered on the lower portion of the wearer’s left pocket, between the left and right edges and bottom flap and pocket. A tie will be worn with the long-sleeved shirt, but is optional with the short-sleeved shirt. General officers may wear the wing and star design, silver belt buckle.

Placement of the name tag: The name tag will be centered, resting on, but not over the edge of the pleated pocket on the wearer’s right. The name tag will be blue plastic with the last name engraved in white lettering.

Placement of the shoulder boards: Shoulder boards on the air force class “B” blue long sleeve shirt.

XIV. Basic First Aid See American Red Cross Addendum. https://www.redcross.org/images/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m4240170_Adult_ready_reference.pdf.

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XV. NCO Creed

No one is more professional than I. I am a noncommissioned officer, a leader of Soldiers. As a noncommissioned officer, I realize that I am a member of a time honored corps, which is known as "The Backbone of the Army." I am proud of the Corps of noncommissioned officers and will at all times conduct myself so as to bring credit upon the Corps, the military service and my country regardless of the situation in which I find myself. I will not use my grade or position to attain pleasure, profit, or personal safety.

Competence is my watchword. My two basic responsibilities will always be uppermost in my mind—accomplishment of my mission and the welfare of my Soldiers. I will strive to remain technically and tactically proficient. I am aware of my role as a noncommissioned officer. I will fulfill my responsibilities inherent in that role. All Soldiers are entitled to outstanding leadership; I will provide that leadership. I know my Soldiers and I will always place their needs above my own. I will communicate consistently with my Soldiers and never leave them uninformed. I will be fair and impartial when recommending both rewards and punishment.

Officers of my unit will have maximum time to accomplish their duties; they will not have to accomplish mine. I will earn their respect and confidence as well as that of my Soldiers. I will be loyal to those with whom I serve; seniors, peers, and subordinates alike. I will exercise initiative by taking appropriate action in the absence of orders. I will not compromise my integrity, or my moral courage. I will not forget, nor will I allow my comrades to forget that we are professionals, noncommissioned officers, leaders!

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Enclosure 1: Enlisted Aide Points of Contact The below listed points of contact should be used for any questions the general officer or their staff has regarding the enlisted aide program to include the hiring process and policies associated with the enlisted aide duties. Assistant Executive Officer: Quartermaster General: Director of the Army Staff US Army Quartermaster School Office of the Chief of Staff ATTN: Commanding General Washington, DC 20310 Bldg 5020, 2221 Adams Ave (703) 695-3353 Fort Lee, VA 23801 (804) 734-3458 Senior Enlisted Aide Advisor: Director of Training: Joint Culinary Center of Excellence Joint Culinary Center of Excellence ATTN: Senior Enlisted Aide Advisor ATTN: Director of Training 1630 Byrd Ave 1630 Byrd Avenue Fort Lee, VA 23801 Fort Lee, VA 23801 (804) 734-3103 (804) 734-3192 Human Resources Command Professional Development NCO: Commander US Army Human Resources Command ATTN: 92G QM Branch Enlisted Aide Manager USAHRC Fort Knox, KY 40121 (502) 613-5260 General Officer Management Office ATTN: Executive Officer Washington, DC 20310 (703) 697-9464

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Enclosure 2: Enlisted Aide Applicable Documents -DOD Instruction 1315.09, “Utilization of Enlisted Personnel on Personal Staffs of General and Flag Officers,” 6 March 2015 -Title 10, United States Code -Army Regulation 614-200, “Enlisted Assignments and Utilization Management,” 26 February 2009, as amended -Army Regulation 350-1, “Army Training and Leader Development,” 19 August 2014 -Army Regulation 670-1, “Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia,” 10 April 2015 -Department of the Army Pamphlet 600-25, “US Army Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Guide,” 28 July 2008 -DOD 7000.14-R, “Department of Defense Financial Management Regulations (FMRs),” date varies by volume -Joint Travel Regulations “Uniformed Service Members and DOD Civilian Employees,” current edition -DOD Instruction 7250.13, “Use of Appropriated Funds for Official Representation Purposes,” 30 June 2009

-DOD 5500.7-R, “Joint Ethics Regulation,” 29 November 2007 -Director of Army Staff Memorandum, subject: Enlisted Aide Program, June 2015 -Department of the Army Pamphlet 611-21, Military Occupational Classification and Structure, 22 January 2007 -Department of the Army Pamphlet 623–3, Evaluation Reporting System, 5 June 2012 -Department of the Army Pamphlet 670-1, Guide to the Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, 10 April 2015

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Enclosure 3: Bureau of Labor Statistics Wage Guide Step 1. Go to www.bls.gov. Step 2. From the BLS Home Page, place cursor on “Subject Areas” and click on “Wages by Area & Occupation”.

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Step 3. Go to “Wage Data by State” and click on “By State”.

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Step 4. Click on the state that you are in or in which you are obtaining wage rate data. For example – click on “DC”

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Step 5. Click on the major occupational group in which you are obtaining data. For example click on “Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations”.

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Step 6. Find the median hourly wage for the service in which you are interested. For example – the median hourly wage for a “bartender” in the DC area is $9.50.

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Enclosure 4: Enlisted Aide Records Management 1. Army Records Information Management System (ARIMS) The ARIMS focuses on the management of long-term and permanent records and allows the business process management of short-term records. It addresses only the record copy of information; all other copies of the same information may be disposed of when no longer needed for business not to exceed the time that the record copy is kept. 2. Identifying Recordkeeping Requirements Unscheduled records are those records that do not have a disposition schedule approved by National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Records not identified or described in the ARIMS Record Retention Schedule-Army (RRS-A) should be brought to the attention of the records management officer who will assist in obtaining a valid Record Number (RN). New RN requirements or changes to existing numbers will be submitted through agency records channels to USARMDA (JDRP-RDR), 7701 Telegraph Road, Alexandria, VA 22315-3860, for coordination with the proponent of the prescribing directive that created or changed the need for the RN. The following inventories and/or reports may be an unscheduled record that does not have a disposition schedule. Government Furnishing Inventory Worksheet Maintenance Record Worksheet Monthly Household Expense Report Official Representation Fund (ORF) Worksheet Security Container Check Sheet (SF 702) Secure Terminal Equipment (STE) Log 3. Electronic Recordkeeping Army records, regardless of medium, must follow the disposition instructions identified in ARIMS RRS-A and comply with the security requirements of AR 25-2. Any electronic information generated by or contained in an information system or other automation source, created or received during the conduct of business, must be preserved according to those instructions (or if unscheduled, as established by the activity records manager per AR 25-400-2). This includes information contained in enterprise information systems, command or installation unique systems, e-mail systems, and systems maintained in the office environment. The procedures for saving electronic records should be determined as early as possibly in the life cycle of a system.

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4. Filing Procedures Effective records maintenance and reference procedures are essential to document the Army’s official business. The ARIMS supports the conservation and use of all supplies and equipment. Records should be maintained electronically when possible. Examine records prior to filing to ensure all actions are complete and eliminate unnecessary attachments such as used envelopes, routing slips that bear no essential information and extra copies, remove all cover sheets, and staple hardcopy documents if possible. Other fasteners may be used when there are too many papers for stapling or physical characteristics prohibit stapling. File classified and unclassified documents separately unless the record contains both classified and unclassified and reference needs require that both need to be filed together. Examples of file labels K 1n1 Office mail controls-Accountable mail receipts (07)

PA: NA

Keep in CFA until 2 years old, then destroy.

KN 1w Office general personnel files – Smith, John (07)

PA: A0001SAIS

Keep in CFA until NLN, NTE 6 years, then destroy.

KE 1h Information access files – Alpha Company (07)

PA: A0380-67DAMI

Keep in CFA 2 years after authorization expires, then destroy.

KEN 1r Office classified materials inventories (07)

PA: A0001DAMI

Keep in CFA until NLN after next inventory, NTE 6 years,

then destroy.

T 1hh Office temporary duty travel (07)

PA: T7333DFAS

Keep in CFA until NLN, then TRF RHA.

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5. Office Records Lists Office records lists (ORLs) are required and will be prepared using the Records Management Assistance module in ARIMS to the greatest extent possible. The link to ARIMS is https://www.arims.army.mil. Training will be established by the local G-1 and the installation records management officer. Office records list format:

Record

category

Record title Record

type

Duration Permanent Disposition

authority

Privacy

Act

number

Record

number

Prescribing

directive

Status

Housekeeping

files

Office

records list

K N/A No NN-166-

204

N/A 1a N/A Approved

Administration Conferences T N/A Yes NC1-AU-

78-36

N/A 1-1m1 1-1 Approved

Military Police Criminal

Investigation

data

references-

cards sent to

CRC

T 40 No NC1-AU-

78-78

A0190-

45

DAMO

190-

45g1

190-45 Pending

Decorations,

awards, and

honors

Incentive

award cases

K N/A No GRS 1-12a A0690-

200

AHRC

672-20b 672-20 Approved

Historical

activities

Annual

historical

summaries-

other records

T 10 No NC1-AU-

80-34

N/A 870-5c2 870-5 Approved

6. Records Disposal Unclassified records authorized for destruction will be destroyed by shredding or burning. Classified records will be destroyed in accordance with AR 385-5. Disposition Standards: If the disposition code is- The abbreviated

disposition instructions

are-

Then the full disposition

standard would be-

And the minimum labeling

instructions would be-

K (Time periods .25

through 6) (Example K3)

Keep in Current Files Area

(CFA).

Keep in the current files

area until time period

specified has passed, then

destroy.

The letter K, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

KE (Time periods .25

through 6 plus event)

(Example KE4)

Keep in CFA until a

specific event occurs.

Keep the current files area

until the event occurs and

then the specified period of

time after the event occurs,

then destroy.

The letters KE, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

KN (Time period not

known)

Keep in CFA. Keep in current files area

until no longer needed for

conducting business, but

not more than 6 years, then

destroy.

The letters KN, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

KEN (Event, but time

period not known

Keep in CFA until a

specific event occurs.

Keep in current files area

until the event occurs and

then until no longer needed

for conducting business,

but not more than 6 years

after the event, then

destroy.

The letters KEN, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number

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R Rescinded record number Not applicable. (Maintain

and dispose of existing

records in accordance with

original disposition

instructions.)

Label for existing records

should show original

disposition instructions.

S Superseded record number Not applicable. (Maintain

and dispose of existing

records in accordance with

original disposition

instructions.)

Label should show the

replacement disposition

code letter(s), a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

T (Time periods over 6

years) (Examples: T6.25,

T15)

Transfer to Army

Electronic Archive (AEA),

Records Holding Area

(RHA), or other specified

location (For example

National Personnel

Records Center (NPRC).)

Keep in current files area

until no longer needed for

conducting business, then

retire to the AEA, RHA, or

other specified location.

The letter T, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

TE (Time periods over 6

years, plus event)

(Example: TE20)

Transfer to AEA, RHA, or

other specified location

(for example, NPRC) after

a specific event occurs.

Keep in current files area

until the event occurs; then

retire to the AEA, RHA, or

other specified location

when no longer needed for

conducting business.

The letter TE, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

If the disposition code is- The abbreviated disposition

instructions are-

Then the full disposition

standard would be-

And the minimum labeling

instructions would be-

TEP Transfer to AEA or RHA

after a specific event

occurs. Permanent record.

Keep in current files area

until event occurs; then

retire to the AEA or RHA

when no longer needed for

conducting business.

The letter TEP, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

TP Transfer Permanent. Keep in the current files

area until no longer needed

for conducting business,

then retire to the AEA or

RHA.

The letter TP, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

U Unscheduled record. Keep in CFA until

disposition instructions are

published then apply

approved disposition.

The letter U, a title, the

year created, and if

applicable, a PA system

notice number.

* NOTE: If your files are Unscheduled records (U) you must apply the procedures in paragraph C-2. Your Installation Records Manager will be assist.

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Enclosure 5: Sample Forms

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UNIT LETTERHEAD

OFFICE SYMBOL Date MEMORANDUM FOR Commander, ACOM IAW AR 700-84, Table 8-1, Fort Somewhere, US 12345-6789 SUBJECT: Request for Civilian Clothing Allowance (CCA) 1. References: a. DoDI 1315.09, Utilization of Enlisted Personnel on Personal Staff of General and Flag Officers, 6 March 2015. b. AR 700-84, Issue and Sale of Personal Clothing, 18 November 2004. 2. Under the provisions and procedures contained in references above request the following individual be granted a Civilian Clothing Allowance for use in the performance of official duties: a. Rank/Name: SFC John G. Soldier, SSN: 123-45-6789, MOS/SSI: 92G50Z5 b. MACOM: MDW; TDA/UIC#: W0UC01; PARA 002 LIN 04, Assigned Unit: HQ Company USA, Fort Momma, VA. c. Date/ETS, retire, or release from active duty: 01 May 2022 d. Report date to assignment requiring CCA: 01 April 2014 e. DEROS/PCS Date: 01 April 2017 f. Start/end dates of CCA assignment: 01 April 2014 thru 01 April 2017 g. Date the wear of civilian clothes was mandatory: 01 April 2014 h. Date last CCA authorized and amount: No previous CCA. 3. Sergeant Soldier’s duty assignment as the Enlisted-Aide to the Duty Title requires that he/she maintain appropriate civilian attire in order to fulfill his/her official duties. This Soldier is required to wear civilian clothing full-time for official duties for approximately 36 months or as long as he/she serves as an Enlisted-Aide. The soldier will purchase clothing locally within 30 days, and will provide a copy of the sales receipt(s) to his/her supervisor. 4. Point of contact for this action is SFC Red, (703) 695-4381, [emailprotected]. FIRST M. LAST COL, USA Executive Officer or A-d-C

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DA Form 2166-8-1, NCOER Counseling and Support Form

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DA Form 2166-8-1, NCOER Counseling and Support Form

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Appendix A References Section I Required Publications

AR 190–51 Security of Unclassified Army Property (Sensitive and Nonsensitive) (Sep 1993) AR 614-200 Enlisted Assignments and Utilization Management (Sep 2009) AR 670-1 Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia (Apr 2015)

AR 700-84 Issue and Sale of Personal Clothing (Jul 2014) DA PAM 611-21 Military Occupational Classification and Structure (Jan 2007)

DA PAM 623–3 Evaluation Reporting System (Mar 2014) DoDI 1315.09 Utilization of Enlisted Personnel on Personal Staffs of General and Flag Officers (Mar 2015) DoDI 5000.64 Accountability and Management of DoD Equipment and Other Accountable Property (May 2011)

DoD 5500.7-R Joint Ethics Regulation, current version (Nov 2007) DoD 7000.14-R Financial Management Regulation (Jun 2008) Joint Federal Travel Regulations Service Etiquette book ISBN 0-87021-620-1

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Working the Plate: The Art of Food Presentation Food Presentation Secrets: Styling Techniques of Professionals ISBN-10: 047147939X ISBN-13: 978-0471479390 Kiss, Bow, or Shake Hands ISBN 1-55850-444-3 Section II Related Publications A related publication is a source of additional information. The user does not have to read a related publication to understand this publication. Director of Army Staff Memorandum Enlisted Aide Training Course, (Aug 2004) AR 37-47 Official Representation Funds of the Secretary of the Army (Sep 2012) AR 190-13 The Army Physical Security Program (Feb 2011) AR 190–51 Security of Unclassified Army Property (Sensitive and Nonsensitive) (Sep 1993)

AR 623-3 Evaluation Reporting System (Mar 2014) FM 6-22 Army Leadership; Competent, Confident, and Agile; Change 1 (Jul 2014) TB MED 530 Occupational and Environmental Health – Food Sanitation (Apr 2014) CTA 50-900 Clothing and Individual Equipment (Nov 2008) Joint Publication 3-07.2 Antiterrorism (Nov 2010) Department of Defense DOD 5500.07-R (series) Joint Ethics Regulations DODD 5500.07-R DOD Directive 1315.9 (series) Utilization of Enlisted Personnel on Personal Staffs of General and Flag Officers

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US CODE 10 Section 3639 Section III Prescribed Forms Except where otherwise indicated below, the following forms are available as follows: DA forms are available on the Army Electronic Library (AEL) CD–ROM (EM 0001) and USAPA Web site (www.apd.army.mil); DD Forms are available from the OSD Web site (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives.infomgt/forms/formsprogram.htm); and SF are available on the U.S. General Service Administration Web site (http://www.gsa.gov). DA Form 1687 Notice of Delegation of Authority DA Form 2166-8 NCO Evaluation Report DA Form 2166–8–1. NCOER Counseling and Support Form DA Form 3234 Inventory Record DA Form 3234-1 Monthly Inventory Recap Sheet DA Form 3546 Control Record for Dining Facility DA Form 4856 Developmental Counseling Form DD Form 250 Material Inspection and Receiving Report DD Form 1149 Requisition and Invoice/Shipping Document DD Form 1348-1a Issue Release/Receipt Document SF 86 Personnel Security Questionnaire SF 702

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Security Container Check Sheet SF 1164 Claim for Reimbursem*nt for Expenditures on Official Business ATF F 1613.1 Bomb Threat Sheet Section IV Reference Forms Except where otherwise indicated below, the following forms are available as follows: DA forms are available on the Army Electronic Library (AEL) CD–ROM (EM 0001) and USAPA Web site (www.apd.army.mil); DD Forms are available from the OSD Web site (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives.infomgt/forms/formsprogram.htm); and SF are available on the U.S. General Service Administration Web site (http://www.gsa.gov).

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Appendix B: Abbreviations ACOM Army Command ACOS Assistant Chief of Staff ACU Army Combat Uniform APSR Accountable Property System of Record APFU Army Physical Fitness Uniform ASO Automation Support Office ATF Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives CAC Common Access Card CCA Civilian Clothing Allowance CG Commanding General CIF Central Issue Facility CJCS Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff CONUS Continental United States COS Chief of Staff

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CSA Chief of Staff of the Army CTA Common Table of Allowances DA Department of the Army DAS Director of the Army Staff DOD Department of Defense DODCCF Department of Defense Central Clearance Facility DODD Department of Defense Directive DODI Department of Defense Instruction DRU Direct Reporting Unit DSS Defense Security Service DV Distinguished Visitor EA Enlisted Aide EATC Enlisted Aide Training Course EOM End of Month FPCON Force Protection Condition

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FSO Food Service Officer G/FOQ General/Flag Officer's Quarters (US Army) GOMO General Officer Management Office HQ Headquarters HQDA Headquarters, Department of the Army HRC Human Resource Command HSR Housing Service Request ID Identification Data ISBN International Standard Book Number JAG Judge Advocate General JCCoE Joint Culinary Center of Excellence JER Joint Ethics Regulation MOS Military Occupational Specialty NCO Non-Commissioned Officer NCOER Non-Commissioned Officer Evaluation Report

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NCOES Non-Commissioned Officer Evaluation System NCOIC Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge NSA National Security Agency OCONUS Outside Continental United States ORF Official Representation Funds OPPS Office of Personnel Protective Services OPSEC Operations Security OPTEMPO Operating Tempo PAO Public Affairs Officer PDNCO Professional Development NCO PMO Provost Marshall Office POC Point of Contact POV Privately Owned Vehicle PPV Public-Private Venture QMG Quartermaster General

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QMS Quartermaster School RDI Regimental Distinctive Insignia SES Senior Executive Service SF Standard Form SGM Sergeant Major SMC Sergeant Major Course SOP Standard Operating Procedures SSD Structured Self Development STE Secure Terminal Equipment TAPES Total Army Performance Evaluation System TDY Temporary Duty TRADOC Training and Doctrine Command UCMJ Uniform Code of Military Justice UIC Unit Identification Code VIP Very Important Person

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XO Executive Officer

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